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Article: Long-Term Maintenance of Alveolar Bone Gain after Implantation of Autolyzed, Antigen-Extracted, Allogenic Bone in Periodontal Intraosseous Defects

TitleLong-Term Maintenance of Alveolar Bone Gain after Implantation of Autolyzed, Antigen-Extracted, Allogenic Bone in Periodontal Intraosseous Defects
Authors
KeywordsPeriodontal regeneration
Periodontitis/therapy
Alveolar ridge augmentation
Bone regeneration
Bone, demineralized
Bone, freeze-dried
Grafts, bone
Issue Date1998
Citation
Journal of Periodontology, 1998, v. 69, n. 1, p. 47-53 How to Cite?
AbstractTHIS RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL assessed the long-term maintenance of alveolar bone gain after implantation of autolyzed, antigen-extracted, allogenic (AAA) bone. AAA bone is a demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft processed after previously described methods. In each of 14 patients, AAA bone was implanted into the intraosseous defect of 1 tooth (test); a second tooth with an intraosseous defect was treated by modified Widman flap surgery alone (control). All patients were offered supportive periodontal therapy at 3- to 6-month intervals following treatment. Clinical measurements were taken prior to surgery, 6 months, and 3 years following surgery. Of the 14 patients enrolled, 11 patients completed the 6-month and 8 patients the 3-year examination. In test teeth, bone gain was significantly greater compared to control teeth at 6 months (2.2±0.5 mm and 1.2±0.5 mm, respectively) and 3 years (2.3±0.7 mm and 1.1 ±0.8 mm, respectively) (P < 0.05). Also, more probing attachment was gained in test compared to control teeth at 3 years (2.0±0.7 mm and 0.8±0.5 mm, respectively; P < 0.05). At 3 years, Porphyromonas gingivalis was detected in 3 test and 2 control teeth by polymerase chain reaction, whereas no Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was found. Due to the low detection frequency, there was no clear correlation between the maintenance of alveolar bone during supportive periodontal therapy and subgingival infection with P. gingivalis. The data indicated that alveolar bone gain after implantation of AAA bone may be maintained over a minimum of 3 years in patients receiving periodontal supportive therapy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200063
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.844
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.070
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFlemmig, Thomas Frank-
dc.contributor.authorEhmke, Benjamin-
dc.contributor.authorBolz, Katja-
dc.contributor.authorKübler, Norbert R.-
dc.contributor.authorKarch, Helge W.-
dc.contributor.authorReuther, Jürgen Friedrich-
dc.contributor.authorKlaiber, Bernd-
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-26T23:11:05Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-26T23:11:05Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Periodontology, 1998, v. 69, n. 1, p. 47-53-
dc.identifier.issn0022-3492-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200063-
dc.description.abstractTHIS RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL assessed the long-term maintenance of alveolar bone gain after implantation of autolyzed, antigen-extracted, allogenic (AAA) bone. AAA bone is a demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft processed after previously described methods. In each of 14 patients, AAA bone was implanted into the intraosseous defect of 1 tooth (test); a second tooth with an intraosseous defect was treated by modified Widman flap surgery alone (control). All patients were offered supportive periodontal therapy at 3- to 6-month intervals following treatment. Clinical measurements were taken prior to surgery, 6 months, and 3 years following surgery. Of the 14 patients enrolled, 11 patients completed the 6-month and 8 patients the 3-year examination. In test teeth, bone gain was significantly greater compared to control teeth at 6 months (2.2±0.5 mm and 1.2±0.5 mm, respectively) and 3 years (2.3±0.7 mm and 1.1 ±0.8 mm, respectively) (P < 0.05). Also, more probing attachment was gained in test compared to control teeth at 3 years (2.0±0.7 mm and 0.8±0.5 mm, respectively; P < 0.05). At 3 years, Porphyromonas gingivalis was detected in 3 test and 2 control teeth by polymerase chain reaction, whereas no Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was found. Due to the low detection frequency, there was no clear correlation between the maintenance of alveolar bone during supportive periodontal therapy and subgingival infection with P. gingivalis. The data indicated that alveolar bone gain after implantation of AAA bone may be maintained over a minimum of 3 years in patients receiving periodontal supportive therapy.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Periodontology-
dc.subjectPeriodontal regeneration-
dc.subjectPeriodontitis/therapy-
dc.subjectAlveolar ridge augmentation-
dc.subjectBone regeneration-
dc.subjectBone, demineralized-
dc.subjectBone, freeze-dried-
dc.subjectGrafts, bone-
dc.titleLong-Term Maintenance of Alveolar Bone Gain after Implantation of Autolyzed, Antigen-Extracted, Allogenic Bone in Periodontal Intraosseous Defects-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid9527561-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031608498-
dc.identifier.volume69-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage47-
dc.identifier.epage53-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000071889500008-

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