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Article: Guided tissue regeneration using a polylactic acid barrier. Part I: Environmental effects on bacterial colonization

TitleGuided tissue regeneration using a polylactic acid barrier. Part I: Environmental effects on bacterial colonization
Authors
KeywordsColonization
Polylactic acid
Microbiology
Guided tissue regeneration
Issue Date2003
Citation
Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 2003, v. 30, n. 1, p. 19-25 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the dynamics of bacterial colonization in intra-osseous defects following guided tissue regeneration (GTR) therapy using a resorbable barrier. Patients and methods: In each of 30 patients, one intra-osseous defect was treated with GTR using a polylactic acid membrane (Guidor®). Plaque samples were taken from the defect site, other teeth and mucous membranes following initial therapy (baseline), and at 3, 6 and 12 months after periodontal surgery. Additionally, samples were taken from the defect sites at 1, 2 and 4 weeks. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A.a.), Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.), and Bacteroides forsythus (B.f.) were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Supportive periodontal therapy was performed at 3-month intervals. Results: In the 29 patients completing the study, the assessed microflora was detected in 3 (A.a.), 13 (P.g.) and 14 (B.f.) defect sites at baseline, in 2 (A.a.), 2 (P.g.) and 2 (B.f.) following surgical debridement, and in 6 (A.a.), 10 (P.g.) and 22 (B.f.) at 12 months. Defect site colonization following GTR therapy was significantly correlated with presurgical colonization at other assessed teeth (A.a. and P.g.: tau=0.45 and 0.66, respectively; P<0.001), or on mucous membranes (B.f: tau=0.44, P<0.001). Conclusion: The colonization of periodontal pathogens at sites treated by GTR may correlate with the intra-oral presence of these pathogens before surgery. If colonization of GTR sites by periodontal pathogens is to be prevented, intra-oral suppression/eradication of these pathogens may be required before surgery.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199894
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.915
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.848
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRüdiger, Stefan G.-
dc.contributor.authorEhmke, Benjamin-
dc.contributor.authorHommens, A.-
dc.contributor.authorKarch, Helge W.-
dc.contributor.authorFlemmig, Thomas Frank-
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-26T23:10:53Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-26T23:10:53Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Periodontology, 2003, v. 30, n. 1, p. 19-25-
dc.identifier.issn0303-6979-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199894-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the dynamics of bacterial colonization in intra-osseous defects following guided tissue regeneration (GTR) therapy using a resorbable barrier. Patients and methods: In each of 30 patients, one intra-osseous defect was treated with GTR using a polylactic acid membrane (Guidor®). Plaque samples were taken from the defect site, other teeth and mucous membranes following initial therapy (baseline), and at 3, 6 and 12 months after periodontal surgery. Additionally, samples were taken from the defect sites at 1, 2 and 4 weeks. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A.a.), Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.), and Bacteroides forsythus (B.f.) were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Supportive periodontal therapy was performed at 3-month intervals. Results: In the 29 patients completing the study, the assessed microflora was detected in 3 (A.a.), 13 (P.g.) and 14 (B.f.) defect sites at baseline, in 2 (A.a.), 2 (P.g.) and 2 (B.f.) following surgical debridement, and in 6 (A.a.), 10 (P.g.) and 22 (B.f.) at 12 months. Defect site colonization following GTR therapy was significantly correlated with presurgical colonization at other assessed teeth (A.a. and P.g.: tau=0.45 and 0.66, respectively; P<0.001), or on mucous membranes (B.f: tau=0.44, P<0.001). Conclusion: The colonization of periodontal pathogens at sites treated by GTR may correlate with the intra-oral presence of these pathogens before surgery. If colonization of GTR sites by periodontal pathogens is to be prevented, intra-oral suppression/eradication of these pathogens may be required before surgery.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Periodontology-
dc.subjectColonization-
dc.subjectPolylactic acid-
dc.subjectMicrobiology-
dc.subjectGuided tissue regeneration-
dc.titleGuided tissue regeneration using a polylactic acid barrier. Part I: Environmental effects on bacterial colonization-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1034/j.1600-051X.2003.300104.x-
dc.identifier.pmid12702107-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037646956-
dc.identifier.volume30-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage19-
dc.identifier.epage25-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000180977200004-

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