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Conference Paper: Trajectory Patterns of Supportive Care Needs Among Chinese Women With Advanced Breast Cancer

TitleTrajectory Patterns of Supportive Care Needs Among Chinese Women With Advanced Breast Cancer
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
The 15th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology and Psychosocial Academy (IPOS 2014), Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 4–8 November 2013. In Psycho-Oncology, 2013, v. 22 suppl. 3, p. 77, abstract no. X-2 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Little is known about the changes in supportive care needs among women with advanced breast cancer (ABC). Understanding how patients’ supportive care needs change during their cancer journey enable us to develop tailored interventions to meet their needs and help control health care costs. The aim of this study was to (1) examine patterns of supportive care needs over the first year following the diagnosis of advanced breast cancer and (2) identify related determinants. METHOD: 228/276 Chinese women newly diagnosed with ABC were recruited from six public oncology units and completed an interview before their first course of chemotherapy, and follow-up interviews at 6-, 12-, 18-weeks, and 12 months subsequently. At baseline, participants were assessed for supportive care needs (SCNS-34), psychological distress (HADS), symptom distress (MSAS), and optimism (C-LOT-R), and patient satisfaction (PSEQ-9). At follow-up, participants completed the measure of supportive care needs. Latent growth mixture modeling was used to identify discreet supportive care needs trajectories. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of trajectory patterns patterns adjusted for demographic and medical characteristics. RESULTS: Two distinct trajectories were identified within Health system & information need (HSI) and Sexuality need domains and three distinct trajectories within Psychological and Physical daily living (PDL) need domains. Most women showed stable low levels of HIS (79%), Psychological (82%), PDL (84%), and Sexuality (97%) supportive care needs. One in five and one in eight women showed high initial needs in HIS, Psychological, and PDL domains, respectively. With the exception of Sexuality needs, trajectory patterns were predicted by physical symptom distress. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to expectations, most Chinese women with advanced breast cancer showed low stable levels of supportive care needs. Physical symptom distress predicted high supportive care needs. RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS: This report is the first describing trajectories of different supportive care need domains in advanced breast cancer, thereby offering new insights into patterns of supportive care needs not previously addressed. The findings challenge assumptions that supportive care needs inevitably increase with advancing disease and raise important questions about the influences on adaptation in advanced breast cancer. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Effective physical symptom management plays an important role in fulfilling women’s supportive care needs, highlighting the importance of the implementation of comprehensive symptom assessment and management in cancer care. This is particularly important as progressive disease generates more impacts. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF FUNDING: This work was supported by a grant from the Hong Kong Cancer Fund and a grant from the Seed Funding Programme for Basic Research by The University of Hong Kong.
DescriptionConference theme: Innovation in Psycho-Oncology: Clinical Care, Research and Advocacy
Oral presentation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199822
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, WWTen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsang, JWHen_US
dc.contributor.authorYeo, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorSuen, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, WMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYau, TKen_US
dc.contributor.authorSoong, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, KYen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwong, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorSuen, TKDen_US
dc.contributor.authorSze, WKen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorGirgis, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorFielding, R-
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T01:39:57Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-22T01:39:57Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 15th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology and Psychosocial Academy (IPOS 2014), Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 4–8 November 2013. In Psycho-Oncology, 2013, v. 22 suppl. 3, p. 77, abstract no. X-2en_US
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199822-
dc.descriptionConference theme: Innovation in Psycho-Oncology: Clinical Care, Research and Advocacy-
dc.descriptionOral presentation-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Little is known about the changes in supportive care needs among women with advanced breast cancer (ABC). Understanding how patients’ supportive care needs change during their cancer journey enable us to develop tailored interventions to meet their needs and help control health care costs. The aim of this study was to (1) examine patterns of supportive care needs over the first year following the diagnosis of advanced breast cancer and (2) identify related determinants. METHOD: 228/276 Chinese women newly diagnosed with ABC were recruited from six public oncology units and completed an interview before their first course of chemotherapy, and follow-up interviews at 6-, 12-, 18-weeks, and 12 months subsequently. At baseline, participants were assessed for supportive care needs (SCNS-34), psychological distress (HADS), symptom distress (MSAS), and optimism (C-LOT-R), and patient satisfaction (PSEQ-9). At follow-up, participants completed the measure of supportive care needs. Latent growth mixture modeling was used to identify discreet supportive care needs trajectories. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of trajectory patterns patterns adjusted for demographic and medical characteristics. RESULTS: Two distinct trajectories were identified within Health system & information need (HSI) and Sexuality need domains and three distinct trajectories within Psychological and Physical daily living (PDL) need domains. Most women showed stable low levels of HIS (79%), Psychological (82%), PDL (84%), and Sexuality (97%) supportive care needs. One in five and one in eight women showed high initial needs in HIS, Psychological, and PDL domains, respectively. With the exception of Sexuality needs, trajectory patterns were predicted by physical symptom distress. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to expectations, most Chinese women with advanced breast cancer showed low stable levels of supportive care needs. Physical symptom distress predicted high supportive care needs. RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS: This report is the first describing trajectories of different supportive care need domains in advanced breast cancer, thereby offering new insights into patterns of supportive care needs not previously addressed. The findings challenge assumptions that supportive care needs inevitably increase with advancing disease and raise important questions about the influences on adaptation in advanced breast cancer. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Effective physical symptom management plays an important role in fulfilling women’s supportive care needs, highlighting the importance of the implementation of comprehensive symptom assessment and management in cancer care. This is particularly important as progressive disease generates more impacts. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF FUNDING: This work was supported by a grant from the Hong Kong Cancer Fund and a grant from the Seed Funding Programme for Basic Research by The University of Hong Kong.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807-
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen_US
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.titleTrajectory Patterns of Supportive Care Needs Among Chinese Women With Advanced Breast Canceren_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, WWT: wwtlam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTsang, JWH: jwhtsang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKwong, A: avakwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSuen, TKD: suentkd@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R: fielding@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, WWT=rp00443en_US
dc.identifier.authorityTsang, JWH=rp00278en_US
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, A=rp01734en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1099-1611.2013.3393-
dc.identifier.hkuros231849en_US
dc.identifier.volume22-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 3-
dc.identifier.spage77, abstract no. X-2-
dc.identifier.epage77, abstract no. X-2-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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