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Article: Complex ecological associations: Evidence for competition and facilitation in a sponge-algal interaction

TitleComplex ecological associations: Evidence for competition and facilitation in a sponge-algal interaction
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Marine Ecology Progress Series, 2014, v. 507, p. 153-167 How to Cite?
AbstractOver the past few decades, Caribbean coral reefs have undergone a phase shift from coral-dominated to algal dominated communities, due to several factors including increased anthropogenic nutrients. With the decline in coral cover, sponges have also become more dominant members of Caribbean coral reef communities. Increased algal and sponge dominance on Caribbean reefs has led to an increase in the frequency of interaction between these two groups. This study used a factorial design to assess the independent and interactive effects of contact and elevated nutrient levels on two common members of these communities, the sponge Aplysina cauliformis, and the macroalga Microdictyon marinum. Algal contact had a significant negative physiological effect on A. cauliformis, affecting both the host sponge and its cyanobacterial symbionts. While elevated nutrient levels had some positive effects on the sponge photosymbionts, this only occurred in the absence of algal contact or a shading/abrasion control, and elevated nutrient levels had a negative effect on the sponge holobiont. In contrast, M. marinum responded positively to experimentally enhanced nutrient levels and to sponge contact under ambient nutrient regimes, but was not affected by sponge contact under elevated nutrient concentrations. Stable isotope enrichment experiments showed that the alga’s positive response to sponge contact was associated with nitrogen transfer from the sponge over the course of the experiment. Thus, while A. cauliformis facilitates increased productivity in M. marinum, algal contact competitively inhibits sponge condition.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199549

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEasson, CGen_US
dc.contributor.authorSlattery, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorBaker, DMen_US
dc.contributor.authorGochfeld, DJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T01:22:47Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-22T01:22:47Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology Progress Series, 2014, v. 507, p. 153-167en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199549-
dc.description.abstractOver the past few decades, Caribbean coral reefs have undergone a phase shift from coral-dominated to algal dominated communities, due to several factors including increased anthropogenic nutrients. With the decline in coral cover, sponges have also become more dominant members of Caribbean coral reef communities. Increased algal and sponge dominance on Caribbean reefs has led to an increase in the frequency of interaction between these two groups. This study used a factorial design to assess the independent and interactive effects of contact and elevated nutrient levels on two common members of these communities, the sponge Aplysina cauliformis, and the macroalga Microdictyon marinum. Algal contact had a significant negative physiological effect on A. cauliformis, affecting both the host sponge and its cyanobacterial symbionts. While elevated nutrient levels had some positive effects on the sponge photosymbionts, this only occurred in the absence of algal contact or a shading/abrasion control, and elevated nutrient levels had a negative effect on the sponge holobiont. In contrast, M. marinum responded positively to experimentally enhanced nutrient levels and to sponge contact under ambient nutrient regimes, but was not affected by sponge contact under elevated nutrient concentrations. Stable isotope enrichment experiments showed that the alga’s positive response to sponge contact was associated with nitrogen transfer from the sponge over the course of the experiment. Thus, while A. cauliformis facilitates increased productivity in M. marinum, algal contact competitively inhibits sponge condition.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Ecology Progress Seriesen_US
dc.titleComplex ecological associations: Evidence for competition and facilitation in a sponge-algal interactionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBaker, DM: dmbaker@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBaker, DM=rp01712en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps10852-
dc.identifier.hkuros231417en_US

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