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Conference Paper: Stupa, Pagoda and Chorten: origin and meaning of Buddhist Architecture

TitleStupa, Pagoda and Chorten: origin and meaning of Buddhist Architecture
Authors
KeywordsStupa
Pagoda
Chorten
Garbha
Tathagatagarbha
Buddha Mind
Issue Date2014
PublisherAthens Institute for Education and Research.
Citation
The 4th Annual International Conference on Architecture, Athens, Greece, 7-10 July 2014. In Atiner's Conference Paper Series No. ARC2014-1094, 2014, p. 3-16 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper discusses the Indian Stupa, the Han Pagoda and the Tibetan Chorten, all three being an important typology of Buddhist Architecture. The Stupa in India first built in the second century BCE to house the Buddha’s relics was later used as symbolic or commemorative purposes. Then Buddhism which started in India reached China at the Han Dynasty (67CE). Together with the literature of teachings came the need for architecture to receive the holy relics as well as to establish educational institutions for Buddhism. So this is the beginning of Buddhist architecture in China. With the fusion of Buddhism and the Han culture and technology, pagodas were built. These buildings find their shapes and sizes in great variety as they appeared in different places. How these forms relate to the philosophy of Buddhism will be discussed. On the other hand, Buddhism was disseminated directly into Tibet in the seventh century. Indian Stupas were also transformed through local culture and technology into Tibetan Chorten. These can be placed within temples or individually. This article will explore the names, the origin and different symbolic meanings of these Stupa, Pagoda and Chorten in the context of the philosophy of Buddhism.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199345
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, WSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T01:14:40Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-22T01:14:40Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 4th Annual International Conference on Architecture, Athens, Greece, 7-10 July 2014. In Atiner's Conference Paper Series No. ARC2014-1094, 2014, p. 3-16en_US
dc.identifier.issn2241-2891 (Online)-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199345-
dc.description.abstractThis paper discusses the Indian Stupa, the Han Pagoda and the Tibetan Chorten, all three being an important typology of Buddhist Architecture. The Stupa in India first built in the second century BCE to house the Buddha’s relics was later used as symbolic or commemorative purposes. Then Buddhism which started in India reached China at the Han Dynasty (67CE). Together with the literature of teachings came the need for architecture to receive the holy relics as well as to establish educational institutions for Buddhism. So this is the beginning of Buddhist architecture in China. With the fusion of Buddhism and the Han culture and technology, pagodas were built. These buildings find their shapes and sizes in great variety as they appeared in different places. How these forms relate to the philosophy of Buddhism will be discussed. On the other hand, Buddhism was disseminated directly into Tibet in the seventh century. Indian Stupas were also transformed through local culture and technology into Tibetan Chorten. These can be placed within temples or individually. This article will explore the names, the origin and different symbolic meanings of these Stupa, Pagoda and Chorten in the context of the philosophy of Buddhism.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAthens Institute for Education and Research.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAtiner's Conference Paper Seriesen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectStupa-
dc.subjectPagoda-
dc.subjectChorten-
dc.subjectGarbha-
dc.subjectTathagatagarbha-
dc.subjectBuddha Mind-
dc.titleStupa, Pagoda and Chorten: origin and meaning of Buddhist Architectureen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, WS: wswong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, WS=rp01029en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros230553en_US
dc.identifier.spage3-
dc.identifier.epage16-
dc.publisher.placeGreeceen_US

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