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Conference Paper: Oral-health beliefs and practices of Bulang people: a qualitative study

TitleOral-health beliefs and practices of Bulang people: a qualitative study
Authors
KeywordsBehavioral science
Epidemiology and Health beliefs
Issue Date2014
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
The 92nd General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), Cape Town, South Africa, 25-28 June 2014. In Journal of Dental Research, 2014, v. 93 n. Special issue B: abstract no. 359 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To explore traditional oral health beliefs and oral health practice among Bulang people, an ethnic minority group who lives in remote villages in Southwest China which is known to have black teeth. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted with ethics approval in 2013 in Yunnan, China where most Bulang people live. The study used a community based participatory method to collect the needed information. Village leaders, chiefs, elders and senior people were invited for a focus group discussion. Questions on traditional oral health beliefs, oral hygiene practice, and traditional therapeutic methods for tackling dental problems were asked. The discussions were video-recorded, transcripts made, and data were extracted. The focus group discussions were repeated in different villages until there was data saturation, i.e. no new information was found. Results: Three focus group discussions with 18 Bulang participants were conducted. They believed their dentition was good if there was no spacing and no pain. They cleaned their teeth with bamboo slice with a roughen surface and by gargling with water. They did not chew betel-nut but believed that chewing bolus which comprised of bark, leaves, tobacco and lime could prevent tooth decay (caries). They put soot on the surface of their teeth regularly in the belief that this would prevent caries and promote dental health. Though this would blacken their teeth, they did not consider this as esthetically unpleasing. When they had caries or toothache, they would topically applied paste made of tobacco debris, beeswax and herbs. They would also take medication with salt, ginger and herbs. Conclusion: The teeth of the Bulang people appear black because they put soot on their teeth regularly for promoting dental health. They believe that having healthy teeth is very important and a black dentition is not unpleasing.
DescriptionPoster Presentation
Session 73: Oral Health Promotion
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199325
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, CHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T01:13:39Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-22T01:13:39Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 92nd General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), Cape Town, South Africa, 25-28 June 2014. In Journal of Dental Research, 2014, v. 93 n. Special issue B: abstract no. 359en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199325-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation-
dc.descriptionSession 73: Oral Health Promotion-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To explore traditional oral health beliefs and oral health practice among Bulang people, an ethnic minority group who lives in remote villages in Southwest China which is known to have black teeth. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted with ethics approval in 2013 in Yunnan, China where most Bulang people live. The study used a community based participatory method to collect the needed information. Village leaders, chiefs, elders and senior people were invited for a focus group discussion. Questions on traditional oral health beliefs, oral hygiene practice, and traditional therapeutic methods for tackling dental problems were asked. The discussions were video-recorded, transcripts made, and data were extracted. The focus group discussions were repeated in different villages until there was data saturation, i.e. no new information was found. Results: Three focus group discussions with 18 Bulang participants were conducted. They believed their dentition was good if there was no spacing and no pain. They cleaned their teeth with bamboo slice with a roughen surface and by gargling with water. They did not chew betel-nut but believed that chewing bolus which comprised of bark, leaves, tobacco and lime could prevent tooth decay (caries). They put soot on the surface of their teeth regularly in the belief that this would prevent caries and promote dental health. Though this would blacken their teeth, they did not consider this as esthetically unpleasing. When they had caries or toothache, they would topically applied paste made of tobacco debris, beeswax and herbs. They would also take medication with salt, ginger and herbs. Conclusion: The teeth of the Bulang people appear black because they put soot on their teeth regularly for promoting dental health. They believe that having healthy teeth is very important and a black dentition is not unpleasing.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectBehavioral science-
dc.subjectEpidemiology and Health beliefs-
dc.titleOral-health beliefs and practices of Bulang people: a qualitative studyen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, ECM: edward-lo@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChu, CH: chchu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ECM=rp00015en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChu, CH=rp00022en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros231059en_US
dc.identifier.volume93en_US
dc.identifier.issueSpecial issue B: abstract no. 359en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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