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Article: Analogy instruction and speech performance under psychological stress

TitleAnalogy instruction and speech performance under psychological stress
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jvoice
Citation
Journal of Voice, 2014, v. 28 n. 2, p. 196-202 How to Cite?
AbstractTo examine the efficacy of explicit and implicit forms of instruction for speech motor performance under conditions of psychological stress. In experiment 1, 20 participants were asked to deliver a formal presentation to validate the modified Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). In experiment 2, 40 participants were instructed explicitly by verbal explanation or implicitly by analogy to speak with minimum pitch variation and were subjected to psychological stress using the modified TSST. Acoustic correlates of pitch height (mean fundamental frequency) and pitch variation (standard deviation of fundamental frequency) significantly increased in experiment 1 when participants delivered a speech under modified TSST condition. In experiment 2, explicitly instructed participants were unable to maintain minimum pitch variation under psychological pressure caused by the modified TSST, whereas analogy-instructed participants maintained minimal pitch variation. The findings are consistent with existing evidence that analogy instructions may result in characteristics of implicit motor learning, such as greater stability of performance under pressure. Analogy instructions may therefore benefit speech motor performance and might provide a useful clinical tool for treatment of speech-disordered populations.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199232
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.113
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.878
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, CYAen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, WKen_US
dc.contributor.authorMa, EPMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhitehill, TLen_US
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T01:09:36Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-22T01:09:36Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Voice, 2014, v. 28 n. 2, p. 196-202en_US
dc.identifier.issn0892-1997-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199232-
dc.description.abstractTo examine the efficacy of explicit and implicit forms of instruction for speech motor performance under conditions of psychological stress. In experiment 1, 20 participants were asked to deliver a formal presentation to validate the modified Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). In experiment 2, 40 participants were instructed explicitly by verbal explanation or implicitly by analogy to speak with minimum pitch variation and were subjected to psychological stress using the modified TSST. Acoustic correlates of pitch height (mean fundamental frequency) and pitch variation (standard deviation of fundamental frequency) significantly increased in experiment 1 when participants delivered a speech under modified TSST condition. In experiment 2, explicitly instructed participants were unable to maintain minimum pitch variation under psychological pressure caused by the modified TSST, whereas analogy-instructed participants maintained minimal pitch variation. The findings are consistent with existing evidence that analogy instructions may result in characteristics of implicit motor learning, such as greater stability of performance under pressure. Analogy instructions may therefore benefit speech motor performance and might provide a useful clinical tool for treatment of speech-disordered populations.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jvoiceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Voiceen_US
dc.titleAnalogy instruction and speech performance under psychological stressen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, CYA: andytcy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, WK: draw@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMa, EPM: estella.ma@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWhitehill, TL: tara@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMa, EPM=rp00933en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWhitehill, TL=rp00970en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jvoice.2013.03.014en_US
dc.identifier.pmid23876939-
dc.identifier.hkuros230953en_US
dc.identifier.volume28en_US
dc.identifier.spage196en_US
dc.identifier.epage202en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000332399000009-

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