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Article: A systematic review on the efficacy, safety and types of Chinese herbal medicine for depression

TitleA systematic review on the efficacy, safety and types of Chinese herbal medicine for depression
Authors
KeywordsMeta-analysis
Depression
Chinese herbal medicine
TCM
Systematic review
Issue Date2014
Citation
Journal of Psychiatric Research, 2014, v. 57 n. 1, p. 165-175 How to Cite?
AbstractChinese herbal medicine (CHM) is one of the commonly used complementary and alternative medicine therapies for major depressive disorder. The objective of this study was to review the efficacy, safety and types of CHM for depression. We systematically searched key databases (9 Chinese and 7 English) up until May 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and examined 7 systematic reviews for additional articles. Methodological quality was assessed by modified Jadad scale and Cochrane's risk of bias assessment. Only studies with moderate methodological quality, defined as modified Jadad scale score ≥3, were included in meta-analysis for efficacy. Of the 296 RCTs that were assessed in details, 278 (93.9%) had modified Jadad scale score < 3, and only 21 scored ≥ 3. The frequently used formulas were Xiao Yao decoction, Chaihu Shugan decoction and Ganmai Dazao decoction; while Chaihu, Bai Shao and Fu Ling were the frequently used single herb. Meta-analyses showed that CHM monotherapy was better than placebo and as effective as antidepressants in reducing Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) score (CHM vs. placebo: mean difference: -7.97, 95% CI: -10.25 to -5.70, P < 0.00001, 2 studies; CHM vs. antidepressants: mean difference: 0.01, 95% CI: -0.28 to 0.30, P = 0.95, 7 studies). CHM were associated with less adverse events than antidepressants, and adding CHM to antidepressants reduced adverse events. Despite the overall positive results, due to the small number of studies with sufficient methodological quality, it is premature to accurately conclude the benefits and risks of CHM for depression. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198792
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.465
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.265
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, Wingfai-
dc.contributor.authorChung, Ka Fai-
dc.contributor.authorNg, Kayan-
dc.contributor.authorYu, Yeeman-
dc.contributor.authorZiea, Eric Tat Chi-
dc.contributor.authorNg, Bacon-
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-09T03:42:15Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-09T03:42:15Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Psychiatric Research, 2014, v. 57 n. 1, p. 165-175-
dc.identifier.issn0022-3956-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198792-
dc.description.abstractChinese herbal medicine (CHM) is one of the commonly used complementary and alternative medicine therapies for major depressive disorder. The objective of this study was to review the efficacy, safety and types of CHM for depression. We systematically searched key databases (9 Chinese and 7 English) up until May 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and examined 7 systematic reviews for additional articles. Methodological quality was assessed by modified Jadad scale and Cochrane's risk of bias assessment. Only studies with moderate methodological quality, defined as modified Jadad scale score ≥3, were included in meta-analysis for efficacy. Of the 296 RCTs that were assessed in details, 278 (93.9%) had modified Jadad scale score < 3, and only 21 scored ≥ 3. The frequently used formulas were Xiao Yao decoction, Chaihu Shugan decoction and Ganmai Dazao decoction; while Chaihu, Bai Shao and Fu Ling were the frequently used single herb. Meta-analyses showed that CHM monotherapy was better than placebo and as effective as antidepressants in reducing Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) score (CHM vs. placebo: mean difference: -7.97, 95% CI: -10.25 to -5.70, P < 0.00001, 2 studies; CHM vs. antidepressants: mean difference: 0.01, 95% CI: -0.28 to 0.30, P = 0.95, 7 studies). CHM were associated with less adverse events than antidepressants, and adding CHM to antidepressants reduced adverse events. Despite the overall positive results, due to the small number of studies with sufficient methodological quality, it is premature to accurately conclude the benefits and risks of CHM for depression. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Psychiatric Research-
dc.subjectMeta-analysis-
dc.subjectDepression-
dc.subjectChinese herbal medicine-
dc.subjectTCM-
dc.subjectSystematic review-
dc.titleA systematic review on the efficacy, safety and types of Chinese herbal medicine for depression-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.05.016-
dc.identifier.pmid24974002-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84905562118-
dc.identifier.hkuros229801-
dc.identifier.hkuros243573-
dc.identifier.spage165-
dc.identifier.epage175-
dc.identifier.eissn1879-1379-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000341550100021-

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