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Article: Political economy of private firms in China

TitlePolitical economy of private firms in China
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Journal of Comparative Economics, 2014, v. 42 n. 2, p. 286-303 How to Cite?
AbstractThe sweeping change in political economy associated with the rapid growth of the private sector in China is rarely studied empirically in the economics literature. Using four cross-sectional surveys of private firms between 1995 and 2010, we examine the dynamics of rent creation from Party membership and other political connections when the regime changed from anti-capitalistic to pro-capitalistic during the period 2002–2004. We find that entrepreneurs with political connection enjoyed significantly more rents only after the constitutional amendments. This finding sheds lights on the nature of the political economy of today’s Chinese economy. Endogeneity/causality problems are addressed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198585

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, B.Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-07T08:03:11Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-07T08:03:11Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Comparative Economics, 2014, v. 42 n. 2, p. 286-303en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198585-
dc.description.abstractThe sweeping change in political economy associated with the rapid growth of the private sector in China is rarely studied empirically in the economics literature. Using four cross-sectional surveys of private firms between 1995 and 2010, we examine the dynamics of rent creation from Party membership and other political connections when the regime changed from anti-capitalistic to pro-capitalistic during the period 2002–2004. We find that entrepreneurs with political connection enjoyed significantly more rents only after the constitutional amendments. This finding sheds lights on the nature of the political economy of today’s Chinese economy. Endogeneity/causality problems are addressed.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Comparative Economicsen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in <Journal of Comparative Economics>. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in PUBLICATION, [VOL 42, ISSUE 2, (2014)] DOI 10.1016/j.jce.2014.03.006-
dc.titlePolitical economy of private firms in Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGuo, D: diguo@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailJiang, K: jiangkun@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailXu, C: cgxu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGuo, D=rp01065en_US
dc.identifier.authorityJiang, K=rp01520en_US
dc.identifier.authorityXu, C=rp01118en_US
dc.description.naturepreprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jce.2014.03.006-
dc.identifier.hkuros230041en_US
dc.identifier.volume42en_US
dc.identifier.spage286en_US
dc.identifier.epage303en_US

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