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Article: Linearized hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core-related antigen in the natural history of chronic hepatitis B

TitleLinearized hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core-related antigen in the natural history of chronic hepatitis B
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 2014, v. 20 n. 11, p. 1173-1180 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Changes in two novel HBV serologic markers, linearized hepatitis B surface antigen (HQ-HBsAg) and hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg), in the natural history of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) have not been well-characterized. Methods: Serum HQ-HBsAg and HBcrAg levels of 404 Asian treatment-naïve CHB patients were analyzed cross-sectionally. Patients were categorized into 5 groups: immune tolerant (IT-group, n=52), immune clearance (IC-group, n=105), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative hepatitis (ENH-group, n=97), HBeAg-negative quiescent group (ENQ-group, n=95) and CHB with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seroclearance (SC-group, n=55). HQ-HBsAg and HBcrAg were measured and correlated with HBV DNA, HBsAg, HBV genotype and clinical parameters. Results: HQ-HBsAg showed good correlation with HBsAg, especially in the ENQ-group (r=0.874. p<0.001). Correlation of HQ-HBsAg with HBV DNA was less prominent and weakest in ENH-group (r=0.268, p=0.008). HBcrAg correlated best with HBV DNA in ENQ-group (r=0.537, p<0.001). 42.1% of ENQ-group patients had undetectable HBcrAg; this subgroup of patients, when compared to those with detectable HBcrAg, had significantly lower median HBV DNA (3.17/4.48 log IU/mL, p<0.001) and HBsAg (5.05/5.96 log mIU/mL, p<0.001) levels. 40% SC-group patients had detectable HQ-HBsAg and/or HBcrAg up to 42 months after HBsAg seroclearance. When comparing anti-HBs positivity and median time after HBsAg seroclearance in SC-group with and without detectable HQ-HBsAg/HBcrAg, there was no significant difference (22.7%/36.4% respectively, p=0.284 and 76.5/93.2 months respectively, p=0.245). Conclusion: HQ-HBsAg and HBcrAg showed unique patterns of distribution throughout the five disease phases of CHB, including high detectability rates after HBsAg seroclearance, opening up different possibilities for their applicability.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198547

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSeto, WKWen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, DKHen_US
dc.contributor.authorFung, JYYen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, FYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, KSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, CLen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, RMFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-07T07:17:11Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-07T07:17:11Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Microbiology and Infection, 2014, v. 20 n. 11, p. 1173-1180en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198547-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Changes in two novel HBV serologic markers, linearized hepatitis B surface antigen (HQ-HBsAg) and hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg), in the natural history of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) have not been well-characterized. Methods: Serum HQ-HBsAg and HBcrAg levels of 404 Asian treatment-naïve CHB patients were analyzed cross-sectionally. Patients were categorized into 5 groups: immune tolerant (IT-group, n=52), immune clearance (IC-group, n=105), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative hepatitis (ENH-group, n=97), HBeAg-negative quiescent group (ENQ-group, n=95) and CHB with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seroclearance (SC-group, n=55). HQ-HBsAg and HBcrAg were measured and correlated with HBV DNA, HBsAg, HBV genotype and clinical parameters. Results: HQ-HBsAg showed good correlation with HBsAg, especially in the ENQ-group (r=0.874. p<0.001). Correlation of HQ-HBsAg with HBV DNA was less prominent and weakest in ENH-group (r=0.268, p=0.008). HBcrAg correlated best with HBV DNA in ENQ-group (r=0.537, p<0.001). 42.1% of ENQ-group patients had undetectable HBcrAg; this subgroup of patients, when compared to those with detectable HBcrAg, had significantly lower median HBV DNA (3.17/4.48 log IU/mL, p<0.001) and HBsAg (5.05/5.96 log mIU/mL, p<0.001) levels. 40% SC-group patients had detectable HQ-HBsAg and/or HBcrAg up to 42 months after HBsAg seroclearance. When comparing anti-HBs positivity and median time after HBsAg seroclearance in SC-group with and without detectable HQ-HBsAg/HBcrAg, there was no significant difference (22.7%/36.4% respectively, p=0.284 and 76.5/93.2 months respectively, p=0.245). Conclusion: HQ-HBsAg and HBcrAg showed unique patterns of distribution throughout the five disease phases of CHB, including high detectability rates after HBsAg seroclearance, opening up different possibilities for their applicability.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Microbiology and Infectionen_US
dc.titleLinearized hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core-related antigen in the natural history of chronic hepatitis Ben_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSeto, WKW: wkseto2@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, DKH: danywong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailFung, JYY: jfung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHuang, FY: camy@graduate.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, CL: hrmelcl@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYuen, RMF: mfyuen@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySeto, WKW=rp01659en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DKH=rp00492en_US
dc.identifier.authorityFung, JYY=rp00518en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, RMF=rp00479en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1469-0691.12739-
dc.identifier.hkuros230127en_US

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