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Article: Increasing similarity in the dynamics of influenza in two adjacent subtropical Chinese cities following the relaxation of border restrictions

TitleIncreasing similarity in the dynamics of influenza in two adjacent subtropical Chinese cities following the relaxation of border restrictions
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Journal of General Virology, 2014, v. 95, p. 531-538 How to Cite?
AbstractThe drivers of influenza seasonality remain heavily debated, especially in tropical/subtropical regions where influenza activity can peak in winter, during the rainy season, or remain constant throughout the year. We compared the epidemiological and evolutionary patterns of seasonal influenza epidemics in Hong Kong and Shenzhen, two adjacent cities in subtropical southern China. This comparison represents a unique natural experiment, as connectivity between these two cities has increased over the past decade. We found that, whilst summer influenza epidemics in Shenzhen used to peak 1–3 months later than those in Hong Kong, the difference decreased after 2005 (P<0.0001). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that influenza isolates from Shenzhen have become genetically closer to those circulating in Hong Kong over time (P = 0.045). Furthermore, although Shenzhen isolates used to be more distant from the global putative source of influenza viruses than isolates from Hong Kong (P<0.001), this difference has narrowed (P = 0.02). Overall, our study reveals that influenza activities show remarkably distinct epidemiological and evolutionary patterns in adjacent subtropical cities and suggests that human mobility patterns can play a major role in influenza dynamics in the subtropics.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198353
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTan, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, TYen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, SSen_US
dc.contributor.authorViboud, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorWeinberger, DMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-25T03:04:31Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-25T03:04:31Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of General Virology, 2014, v. 95, p. 531-538en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198353-
dc.description.abstractThe drivers of influenza seasonality remain heavily debated, especially in tropical/subtropical regions where influenza activity can peak in winter, during the rainy season, or remain constant throughout the year. We compared the epidemiological and evolutionary patterns of seasonal influenza epidemics in Hong Kong and Shenzhen, two adjacent cities in subtropical southern China. This comparison represents a unique natural experiment, as connectivity between these two cities has increased over the past decade. We found that, whilst summer influenza epidemics in Shenzhen used to peak 1–3 months later than those in Hong Kong, the difference decreased after 2005 (P<0.0001). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that influenza isolates from Shenzhen have become genetically closer to those circulating in Hong Kong over time (P = 0.045). Furthermore, although Shenzhen isolates used to be more distant from the global putative source of influenza viruses than isolates from Hong Kong (P<0.001), this difference has narrowed (P = 0.02). Overall, our study reveals that influenza activities show remarkably distinct epidemiological and evolutionary patterns in adjacent subtropical cities and suggests that human mobility patterns can play a major role in influenza dynamics in the subtropics.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of General Virologyen_US
dc.titleIncreasing similarity in the dynamics of influenza in two adjacent subtropical Chinese cities following the relaxation of border restrictionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TY: ttylam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TY=rp01733en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1099/vir.0.059998-0en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24310518-
dc.identifier.hkuros229498en_US
dc.identifier.volume95en_US
dc.identifier.spage531en_US
dc.identifier.epage538en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000338177500002-

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