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Article: The Emergence and Evolution of Avian H5N2 Influenza viruses in Chickens in Taiwan

TitleThe Emergence and Evolution of Avian H5N2 Influenza viruses in Chickens in Taiwan
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Journal of Virology, 2014, v. 88 n. 10, p. 5677-5686 How to Cite?
AbstractSporadic activity by H5N2 influenza viruses has been observed in chickens in Taiwan from 2003 to 2012. The available information suggests that these viruses were generated by reassortment between a Mexican-like H5N2 and a local enzootic H6N1 virus. Yet, the origin, prevalence and pathogenicity of these H5N2 viruses have not been fully defined. Following the 2012 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreaks, surveillance was conducted from December 2012 to July 2013 at a live-poultry wholesale market in Taipei. Our findings showed that H5N2 and H6N1 viruses co-circulated at low-levels in chickens in Taiwan. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all H5N2 viruses had hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes derived from a 1994 Mexican-like virus, while their internal gene complexes were incorporated from the enzootic H6N1 virus lineage by multiple reassortment events. Pathogenicity studies demonstrated heterogeneous results, even though all tested viruses had motifs (R-X-K/R-R) supportive of high pathogenicity. Serological surveys for common subtypes of avian viruses confirmed the prevalence of the H5N2 and H6N1 viruses in chickens and revealed an extraordinarily high seroconversion rate to an H9N2 virus, a subtype that is not found in Taiwan but is prevalent in Mainland China. These findings suggest that reassortant H5N2, together with H6N1, viruses have become established and enzootic in chickens throughout Taiwan and that a large-scale vaccination program might have been conducted locally, which likely led to the introduction of the 1994 Mexican-like virus to Taiwan in 2003.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198351
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorHUANG, PYen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeng, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, YCen_US
dc.contributor.authorYip, CHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, YTen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CLen_US
dc.contributor.authorCompans, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, DKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, TYen_US
dc.contributor.authorKing, CCen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-25T03:04:26Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-25T03:04:26Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Virology, 2014, v. 88 n. 10, p. 5677-5686en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198351-
dc.description.abstractSporadic activity by H5N2 influenza viruses has been observed in chickens in Taiwan from 2003 to 2012. The available information suggests that these viruses were generated by reassortment between a Mexican-like H5N2 and a local enzootic H6N1 virus. Yet, the origin, prevalence and pathogenicity of these H5N2 viruses have not been fully defined. Following the 2012 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreaks, surveillance was conducted from December 2012 to July 2013 at a live-poultry wholesale market in Taipei. Our findings showed that H5N2 and H6N1 viruses co-circulated at low-levels in chickens in Taiwan. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all H5N2 viruses had hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes derived from a 1994 Mexican-like virus, while their internal gene complexes were incorporated from the enzootic H6N1 virus lineage by multiple reassortment events. Pathogenicity studies demonstrated heterogeneous results, even though all tested viruses had motifs (R-X-K/R-R) supportive of high pathogenicity. Serological surveys for common subtypes of avian viruses confirmed the prevalence of the H5N2 and H6N1 viruses in chickens and revealed an extraordinarily high seroconversion rate to an H9N2 virus, a subtype that is not found in Taiwan but is prevalent in Mainland China. These findings suggest that reassortant H5N2, together with H6N1, viruses have become established and enzootic in chickens throughout Taiwan and that a large-scale vaccination program might have been conducted locally, which likely led to the introduction of the 1994 Mexican-like virus to Taiwan in 2003.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Virologyen_US
dc.titleThe Emergence and Evolution of Avian H5N2 Influenza viruses in Chickens in Taiwanen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, C: ccdavid@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailZhu, H: zhuhch@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYip, CH: yiperic@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, CL: cheungcl@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSmith, DK: dsmith@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TY: ttylam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhu, H=rp01535en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TY=rp01733en_US
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JVI.00139-14en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24623422-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4019133-
dc.identifier.hkuros229494en_US
dc.identifier.volume80en_US
dc.identifier.spage5677en_US
dc.identifier.epage5686en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000335446400042-

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