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Conference Paper: The effect of motor skills training on physical activity in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

TitleThe effect of motor skills training on physical activity in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Sports medicine
Issue Date2014
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.acsm-msse.org
Citation
The 61st Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), 5th World Congress on Exercise is Medicine® and World Congress on the Role of Inflammation in Exercise, Health and Disease, Orlando, FL., 27-31 May 2014. In Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 2014, v. 46 n. 5 suppl., p. S181, no. 859 How to Cite?
AbstractRegular physical activity (PA) contributes to the development of physical and psychological well-being in children. The mastery of motor skills is considered one of the potential factors that facilitate PA engagement. Fundamental movement skills (FMS) are foundations for developing context-specific movements. Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) exhibit delays in motor skills including FMS and experience restrictions in PA participation. However, few studies have examined whether improvements in FMS proficiency promote PA engagement in children with DCD. PURPOSE: To determine the effect of FMS training on PA in children with DCD when compared to typically developing (TD) children. METHODS: Participants consist of 84 children (7-10 yrs) who were allocated into either FMS training (22 DCD-FMS, 17 TD-FMS) or control group who underwent regular physical education lessons (16 DCD-C, 29 TD-C). FMS training was conducted in a school setting for six weeks, twice per week and 35 minutes per session. FMS were tested using the Test of Gross Motor Development-Second edition. PA was subsequently monitored using accelerometers over seven consecutive days. Each participant attended all scheduled tests three times (i.e., before intervention, 1-week post intervention, 6-week post intervention). Repeated-measured ANCOVA was used to determine the intervention effect utilizing baseline scores and other key confounders as covariates. RESULTS: The DCD-FMS group scored significantly better in jumping (1-week: 6.09±1.85 vs. 3.69±1.99, p<0.05) and catching (1-week: 5.23±0.87 vs. 4.19±1.64, p<0.05; 6-week: 5.45±0.72 vs. 4.31±1.58, p<0.05) than the DCD-C group. The TD-FMS group scored significantly poorer in jumping (1-week: 5.41±1.84 vs. 6.52±1.70, p<0.05) than the TD-C group. The DCD-FMS group showed significantly lower PA volume (393.06±64.50 vs. 431.72±87.53 counts/min, p<0.05) and spent more time in sedentary pursuits (52.54±6.55 vs. 50.40 ±7.22%, p<0.05) in the follow-up test than in the posttest. No significant difference in PA levels was found among groups. CONCLUSION: Children with DCD improved their FMS proficiency after receiving FMS training. However, the improvements in FMS performance in children with DCD did not transfer into improving their PA participation.
DescriptionB-41 Free Communication/Poster - Physical Activity Interventions in Youth - Board #274: no. 859
The 2014 Conference abstracts' website is located at http://acsmannualmeeting.org/educational-highlights/final-program-and-abstracts-2014/
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198292
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.041
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.007

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYu, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorSit, CHPen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurnett, AFen_US
dc.contributor.authorCapio, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHa, ASCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-25T03:00:00Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-25T03:00:00Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 61st Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), 5th World Congress on Exercise is Medicine® and World Congress on the Role of Inflammation in Exercise, Health and Disease, Orlando, FL., 27-31 May 2014. In Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 2014, v. 46 n. 5 suppl., p. S181, no. 859en_US
dc.identifier.issn0195-9131-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198292-
dc.descriptionB-41 Free Communication/Poster - Physical Activity Interventions in Youth - Board #274: no. 859-
dc.descriptionThe 2014 Conference abstracts' website is located at http://acsmannualmeeting.org/educational-highlights/final-program-and-abstracts-2014/-
dc.description.abstractRegular physical activity (PA) contributes to the development of physical and psychological well-being in children. The mastery of motor skills is considered one of the potential factors that facilitate PA engagement. Fundamental movement skills (FMS) are foundations for developing context-specific movements. Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) exhibit delays in motor skills including FMS and experience restrictions in PA participation. However, few studies have examined whether improvements in FMS proficiency promote PA engagement in children with DCD. PURPOSE: To determine the effect of FMS training on PA in children with DCD when compared to typically developing (TD) children. METHODS: Participants consist of 84 children (7-10 yrs) who were allocated into either FMS training (22 DCD-FMS, 17 TD-FMS) or control group who underwent regular physical education lessons (16 DCD-C, 29 TD-C). FMS training was conducted in a school setting for six weeks, twice per week and 35 minutes per session. FMS were tested using the Test of Gross Motor Development-Second edition. PA was subsequently monitored using accelerometers over seven consecutive days. Each participant attended all scheduled tests three times (i.e., before intervention, 1-week post intervention, 6-week post intervention). Repeated-measured ANCOVA was used to determine the intervention effect utilizing baseline scores and other key confounders as covariates. RESULTS: The DCD-FMS group scored significantly better in jumping (1-week: 6.09±1.85 vs. 3.69±1.99, p<0.05) and catching (1-week: 5.23±0.87 vs. 4.19±1.64, p<0.05; 6-week: 5.45±0.72 vs. 4.31±1.58, p<0.05) than the DCD-C group. The TD-FMS group scored significantly poorer in jumping (1-week: 5.41±1.84 vs. 6.52±1.70, p<0.05) than the TD-C group. The DCD-FMS group showed significantly lower PA volume (393.06±64.50 vs. 431.72±87.53 counts/min, p<0.05) and spent more time in sedentary pursuits (52.54±6.55 vs. 50.40 ±7.22%, p<0.05) in the follow-up test than in the posttest. No significant difference in PA levels was found among groups. CONCLUSION: Children with DCD improved their FMS proficiency after receiving FMS training. However, the improvements in FMS performance in children with DCD did not transfer into improving their PA participation.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.acsm-msse.org-
dc.relation.ispartofMedicine and Science in Sports and Exerciseen_US
dc.rightsThis is a non-final version of an article published in final form in (provide complete journal citation)-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectSports medicine-
dc.titleThe effect of motor skills training on physical activity in children with Developmental Coordination Disorderen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailSit, CHP: sithp@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCapio, CM: ccapio08@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySit, CHP=rp00957en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCapio, CM=rp01724en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros229154en_US
dc.identifier.volume46en_US
dc.identifier.issue5 suppl.-
dc.identifier.spageS181en_US
dc.identifier.epageS181en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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