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Article: Phylogeographic pattern of Rhizophora (Rhizophoraceae) reveals the importance of both vicariance and long-distance oceanic dispersal to modern mangrove distribution

TitlePhylogeographic pattern of Rhizophora (Rhizophoraceae) reveals the importance of both vicariance and long-distance oceanic dispersal to modern mangrove distribution
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcevolbiol/
Citation
BMC Evolutionary Biology, 2014, v. 14, article no. 83 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Mangroves are key components of coastal ecosystems in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. However, the patterns and mechanisms of modern distribution of mangroves are still not well understood. Historical vicariance and dispersal are two hypothetic biogeographic processes in shaping the patterns of present-day species distributions. Here we investigate evolutionary biogeography of mangroves in the Indo-West Pacific (IWP) and western Atlantic-East Pacific (AEP) regions using a large sample of populations of Rhizophora (the most representative mangrove genus) and a combination of chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences and genome-wide ISSR markers. RESULTS: Our comparative analyses of biogeographic patterns amongst Rhizophora taxa worldwide support the hypothesis that ancient dispersals along the Tethys Seaway and subsequent vicariant events that divided the IWP and AEP lineages resulted in the major disjunctions. We dated the deep split between the Old and New World lineages to early Eocene based on fossil calibration and geological and tectonic changes. Our data also provide evidence for other vicariant processes within the Indo-West Pacific region in separating conspecific lineages of SE Asia and Australia-Pacific at the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. Close genetic affinities exist between extant Fijian and American lineages; East African and Australian lineages; and Australian and Pacific lineages; indicating relatively more recent oceanic long-distance dispersal events. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that neither vicariance nor dispersal alone could explain the observed global occurrences of Rhizophora, but a combination of vicariant events and oceanic long-distance dispersals can account for historical diversification and present-day biogeographic patterns of mangroves.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198244
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.406
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.053
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, EYYen_US
dc.contributor.authorDuke, NCen_US
dc.contributor.authorSun, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-25T02:56:46Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-25T02:56:46Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationBMC Evolutionary Biology, 2014, v. 14, article no. 83en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-2148-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198244-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Mangroves are key components of coastal ecosystems in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. However, the patterns and mechanisms of modern distribution of mangroves are still not well understood. Historical vicariance and dispersal are two hypothetic biogeographic processes in shaping the patterns of present-day species distributions. Here we investigate evolutionary biogeography of mangroves in the Indo-West Pacific (IWP) and western Atlantic-East Pacific (AEP) regions using a large sample of populations of Rhizophora (the most representative mangrove genus) and a combination of chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences and genome-wide ISSR markers. RESULTS: Our comparative analyses of biogeographic patterns amongst Rhizophora taxa worldwide support the hypothesis that ancient dispersals along the Tethys Seaway and subsequent vicariant events that divided the IWP and AEP lineages resulted in the major disjunctions. We dated the deep split between the Old and New World lineages to early Eocene based on fossil calibration and geological and tectonic changes. Our data also provide evidence for other vicariant processes within the Indo-West Pacific region in separating conspecific lineages of SE Asia and Australia-Pacific at the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. Close genetic affinities exist between extant Fijian and American lineages; East African and Australian lineages; and Australian and Pacific lineages; indicating relatively more recent oceanic long-distance dispersal events. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that neither vicariance nor dispersal alone could explain the observed global occurrences of Rhizophora, but a combination of vicariant events and oceanic long-distance dispersals can account for historical diversification and present-day biogeographic patterns of mangroves.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcevolbiol/-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.rightsBMC Evolutionary Biology. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshEcosystem-
dc.subject.meshPhylogeny-
dc.subject.meshRhizophoraceae - genetics-
dc.titlePhylogeographic pattern of Rhizophora (Rhizophoraceae) reveals the importance of both vicariance and long-distance oceanic dispersal to modern mangrove distributionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSun, M: meisun@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySun, M=rp00779en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2148-14-83en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24742016-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4021169-
dc.identifier.hkuros229308en_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000335071800001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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