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Conference Paper: Accuracy of walking direction with and without visual feedback

TitleAccuracy of walking direction with and without visual feedback
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Ophthalmology and optometry
Issue Date2013
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
The 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2013), Naples, FL., 10-15 May 2013. In Journal of Vision, 2013, v. 13 n. 9, article 953 How to Cite?
AbstractDirection of self-motion during walking is indicated by multiple cues, including optic flow, non-visual sensory cues, and motor prediction. I measured the variability in walking direction with and without visual feedback, and tested whether visual and non-visual cues are weighted in an optimal manner. Open-loop walking in an immersive virtual environment was used to assess the accuracy of perceived walking direction. Observers walked toward a target 4m away either with no vision, or vision during the first 1m of walking. Three simulated environments were tested: target-only, target and textured ground, or target with textured ground and scattered posts. With no vision, variability in walking direction averaged 3°. Visual feedback during initial movement reduced variability to about 1.5°, regardless of visual environment. These results show that observers are capable of initiating movement toward a target with reasonable accuracy, but that even a limited amount of visual feedback significantly improves accuracy. Based on these measures, an optimal estimator would strongly weigh visual information. A second experiment measured the perceptual weighting of visual and non-visual cues. Optic flow specified a conflicting heading direction (±5°), and bias in walking direction was used to infer cue weights. Visual heading had a significant effect on walking direction, but the estimated visual weights were smaller than predicted (33-43% vs. 71%), and varied depending on the visual environment. Non-visual information appeared to have more influence than expected given the relative reliability of cues.
DescriptionPoster Session - Perception and action: Locomotion, navigation: no. 53.308
This journal issue entitled: Vision Sciences Society Meeting, 2013: Abstracts
Open Access Journal
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198218
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-25T02:55:40Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-25T02:55:40Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2013), Naples, FL., 10-15 May 2013. In Journal of Vision, 2013, v. 13 n. 9, article 953en_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198218-
dc.descriptionPoster Session - Perception and action: Locomotion, navigation: no. 53.308-
dc.descriptionThis journal issue entitled: Vision Sciences Society Meeting, 2013: Abstracts-
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal-
dc.description.abstractDirection of self-motion during walking is indicated by multiple cues, including optic flow, non-visual sensory cues, and motor prediction. I measured the variability in walking direction with and without visual feedback, and tested whether visual and non-visual cues are weighted in an optimal manner. Open-loop walking in an immersive virtual environment was used to assess the accuracy of perceived walking direction. Observers walked toward a target 4m away either with no vision, or vision during the first 1m of walking. Three simulated environments were tested: target-only, target and textured ground, or target with textured ground and scattered posts. With no vision, variability in walking direction averaged 3°. Visual feedback during initial movement reduced variability to about 1.5°, regardless of visual environment. These results show that observers are capable of initiating movement toward a target with reasonable accuracy, but that even a limited amount of visual feedback significantly improves accuracy. Based on these measures, an optimal estimator would strongly weigh visual information. A second experiment measured the perceptual weighting of visual and non-visual cues. Optic flow specified a conflicting heading direction (±5°), and bias in walking direction was used to infer cue weights. Visual heading had a significant effect on walking direction, but the estimated visual weights were smaller than predicted (33-43% vs. 71%), and varied depending on the visual environment. Non-visual information appeared to have more influence than expected given the relative reliability of cues.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectOphthalmology and optometry-
dc.titleAccuracy of walking direction with and without visual feedbacken_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, J: jsaun@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySaunders, J=rp00638en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/13.9.953-
dc.identifier.hkuros229480en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros229483-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 141212-

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