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Article: A randomized controlled trial to investigate the impact of a low glycemic index (GI) diet on body mass index in obese adolescents.

TitleA randomized controlled trial to investigate the impact of a low glycemic index (GI) diet on body mass index in obese adolescents.
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/
Citation
BMC Public Health, 2014, v. 14, article no. 180 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: The role of a low glycemic index (GI) diet in the management of adolescent obesity remains controversial. In this study, we aim to evaluate the impact of low GI diet versus a conventional Chinese diet on the body mass index (BMI) and other obesity indices of obese adolescents. METHODS: Obese adolescents aged 15-18 years were identified from population-recruited, territory-wide surveys. Obesity was defined as BMI >/=95th percentile of Hong Kong local age- and sex-specific references. Eligible subjects were randomized to either an intervention with low GI diet (consisting of 45-50% carbohydrate, 30-35% fat and 15-20% protein) or conventional Chinese diet as control (consisting of 55-60% carbohydrate, 25-30% fat and 10-15% protein). We used random intercept mixed effects model to compare the differential changes across the time points from baseline to month 6 between the 2 groups. RESULTS: 104 obese adolescents were recruited (52 in low GI group and 52 in control group; 43.3% boys). Mean age was 16.7 +/- 1.0 years and 16.8 +/-1.0 years in low GI and control group respectively. 58.7% subjects completed the study at 6 months (65.4% in low GI group and 51.9% in control group). After adjustment for age and sex, subjects in the low GI group had a significantly greater reduction in obesity indices including BMI, body weight and waist circumference (WC) compared to subjects in the control group (all p <0.05). After further adjustment for physical activity levels, WC was found to be significantly lower in the low GI group compared to the conventional group (p = 0.018). CONCLUSION: Low GI diet in the context of a comprehensive lifestyle modification program may be an alternative to conventional diet in the management of obese adolescents. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov Ref. No: NCT01278563.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198189
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.209
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.372
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKong, APSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChoi, KCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, RSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLok, YWKen_US
dc.contributor.authorOzaki, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, CSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, MMHen_US
dc.contributor.authorSea, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorHenry, CJen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, JCNen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-25T02:52:35Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-25T02:52:35Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationBMC Public Health, 2014, v. 14, article no. 180en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198189-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The role of a low glycemic index (GI) diet in the management of adolescent obesity remains controversial. In this study, we aim to evaluate the impact of low GI diet versus a conventional Chinese diet on the body mass index (BMI) and other obesity indices of obese adolescents. METHODS: Obese adolescents aged 15-18 years were identified from population-recruited, territory-wide surveys. Obesity was defined as BMI >/=95th percentile of Hong Kong local age- and sex-specific references. Eligible subjects were randomized to either an intervention with low GI diet (consisting of 45-50% carbohydrate, 30-35% fat and 15-20% protein) or conventional Chinese diet as control (consisting of 55-60% carbohydrate, 25-30% fat and 10-15% protein). We used random intercept mixed effects model to compare the differential changes across the time points from baseline to month 6 between the 2 groups. RESULTS: 104 obese adolescents were recruited (52 in low GI group and 52 in control group; 43.3% boys). Mean age was 16.7 +/- 1.0 years and 16.8 +/-1.0 years in low GI and control group respectively. 58.7% subjects completed the study at 6 months (65.4% in low GI group and 51.9% in control group). After adjustment for age and sex, subjects in the low GI group had a significantly greater reduction in obesity indices including BMI, body weight and waist circumference (WC) compared to subjects in the control group (all p <0.05). After further adjustment for physical activity levels, WC was found to be significantly lower in the low GI group compared to the conventional group (p = 0.018). CONCLUSION: Low GI diet in the context of a comprehensive lifestyle modification program may be an alternative to conventional diet in the management of obese adolescents. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov Ref. No: NCT01278563.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Public Healthen_US
dc.rightsBMC Public Health. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleA randomized controlled trial to investigate the impact of a low glycemic index (GI) diet on body mass index in obese adolescents.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLok, YWK: krislok@hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2458-14-180en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24552366-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3937245-
dc.identifier.hkuros229490en_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000332724200003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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