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Article: Phylogenetic diversity of a microbialite reef in a cold alkaline freshwater lake

TitlePhylogenetic diversity of a microbialite reef in a cold alkaline freshwater lake
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Canadian Journal of Microbiology, 2014, v. 60 n. 6, p. 391-398 How to Cite?
AbstractA culture-independent multidomain survey of biodiversity in microbialite structures within the cold alkaline Pavilion Lake (British Columbia, Canada) revealed a largely homogenous community at depths from 10 to 30 m. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to demonstrate that bacteria comprised approximately 80%–95% of recoverable phylotypes. Archaeal phylotypes accounted for <5% of the community in microbialites exposed to the water column, while structures in sediment contact supported 4- to 5-fold higher archaeal abundance. Eukaryal phylotypes were rare and indicated common aquatic diatoms that were concluded not to be part of the microbialite community. Phylogenetic analysis of rRNA genes from clone libraries (N = 491) revealed that alphaproteobacterial phylotypes were most abundant. Cyanobacterial phylotypes were highly diverse but resolved into 4 dominant genera: Acaryochloris, Leptolyngbya, Microcoleus, and Pseudanabaena. Interestingly, microbialite cyanobacteria generally affiliated phylogenetically with aquatic and coral cyanobacterial groups rather than those from stromatolites. Other commonly encountered bacterial phylotypes were from members of the Acidobacteria, with relatively low abundance of the Betaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Nitrospirae, and Planctomycetes. Archaeal diversity (N = 53) was largely accounted for by Euryarchaeota, with most phylotypes affiliated with freshwater methanogenic taxa.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197998
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, OWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLacap-Bugler, DCen_US
dc.contributor.authorBiddle, JFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLim, DSen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKay, CPen_US
dc.contributor.authorPointing, SBen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-25T02:38:33Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-25T02:38:33Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationCanadian Journal of Microbiology, 2014, v. 60 n. 6, p. 391-398en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197998-
dc.description.abstractA culture-independent multidomain survey of biodiversity in microbialite structures within the cold alkaline Pavilion Lake (British Columbia, Canada) revealed a largely homogenous community at depths from 10 to 30 m. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to demonstrate that bacteria comprised approximately 80%–95% of recoverable phylotypes. Archaeal phylotypes accounted for <5% of the community in microbialites exposed to the water column, while structures in sediment contact supported 4- to 5-fold higher archaeal abundance. Eukaryal phylotypes were rare and indicated common aquatic diatoms that were concluded not to be part of the microbialite community. Phylogenetic analysis of rRNA genes from clone libraries (N = 491) revealed that alphaproteobacterial phylotypes were most abundant. Cyanobacterial phylotypes were highly diverse but resolved into 4 dominant genera: Acaryochloris, Leptolyngbya, Microcoleus, and Pseudanabaena. Interestingly, microbialite cyanobacteria generally affiliated phylogenetically with aquatic and coral cyanobacterial groups rather than those from stromatolites. Other commonly encountered bacterial phylotypes were from members of the Acidobacteria, with relatively low abundance of the Betaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Nitrospirae, and Planctomycetes. Archaeal diversity (N = 53) was largely accounted for by Euryarchaeota, with most phylotypes affiliated with freshwater methanogenic taxa.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCanadian Journal of Microbiologyen_US
dc.titlePhylogenetic diversity of a microbialite reef in a cold alkaline freshwater lakeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLacap-Bugler, DC: dclacap@hkusua.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1139/cjm-2014-0024en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24861562-
dc.identifier.hkuros229607en_US
dc.identifier.volume60en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage391en_US
dc.identifier.epage398en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000339258400006-

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