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Conference Paper: Deep-Sea Biodiversity Response to Abrupt Climate Changes for the Last 20,000 Years

TitleDeep-Sea Biodiversity Response to Abrupt Climate Changes for the Last 20,000 Years
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherPaleontological Society.
Citation
The 10th North American Paleontological Convention (NAPC), Florida, USA, 15-18 February 2014. In the Paleontological Society. Papers (Special Publication), 2014, v. 13, p. 140, abstract no. Session 28-15 How to Cite?
AbstractHigh-resolution records of microfossil assemblages from deep-sea sediment cores covering the last 20,000 years in the North Atlantic Ocean were investigated to understand biodiversity dynamics over decadal–centennial timescales. The results show pervasive control of deep-sea benthic species diversity by rapidly changing climate. Species diversity rapidly increased during abrupt stadial events during the last deglacial and the Holocene interglacial periods. These included the well-known Heinrich 1, the Younger Dryas, and the 8.2 ka events when the strength of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) decreased. In addition, there is evidence for quasi-cyclic changes in biodiversity at a 1500-year periodicity. Statistical analyses revealed that AMOC-driven bottom-water temperature variability is a primary influence on deep-sea biodiversity. Our results based on the exceptionally highly resolved fossil records highlight possible pervasive, synchronous, and sudden ecosystem response to humaninduced climate and ocean-circulation changes in this century.
DescriptionSession 28: Exceptional Records: Evolution and ecology of microfossils
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197753
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYasuhara, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-29T08:48:56Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-29T08:48:56Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 10th North American Paleontological Convention (NAPC), Florida, USA, 15-18 February 2014. In the Paleontological Society. Papers (Special Publication), 2014, v. 13, p. 140, abstract no. Session 28-15en_US
dc.identifier.issn1089-3326-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197753-
dc.descriptionSession 28: Exceptional Records: Evolution and ecology of microfossils-
dc.description.abstractHigh-resolution records of microfossil assemblages from deep-sea sediment cores covering the last 20,000 years in the North Atlantic Ocean were investigated to understand biodiversity dynamics over decadal–centennial timescales. The results show pervasive control of deep-sea benthic species diversity by rapidly changing climate. Species diversity rapidly increased during abrupt stadial events during the last deglacial and the Holocene interglacial periods. These included the well-known Heinrich 1, the Younger Dryas, and the 8.2 ka events when the strength of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) decreased. In addition, there is evidence for quasi-cyclic changes in biodiversity at a 1500-year periodicity. Statistical analyses revealed that AMOC-driven bottom-water temperature variability is a primary influence on deep-sea biodiversity. Our results based on the exceptionally highly resolved fossil records highlight possible pervasive, synchronous, and sudden ecosystem response to humaninduced climate and ocean-circulation changes in this century.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPaleontological Society.-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Paleontological Society. Papersen_US
dc.titleDeep-Sea Biodiversity Response to Abrupt Climate Changes for the Last 20,000 Yearsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailYasuhara, M: yasuhara@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYasuhara, M=rp01474en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros228853en_US
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.spage140, abstract no. Session 28-15-
dc.identifier.epage140, abstract no. Session 28-15-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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