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Article: Re-examining The Diamond Sūtra Manuscript S.P.2 And Sacred Book Culture In The Tang Dynasty

TitleRe-examining The Diamond Sūtra Manuscript S.P.2 And Sacred Book Culture In The Tang Dynasty
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherBhikkhu Jagadish Kashyap Institute of Buddhist and Asian Studies, Aditya-Shyam Trust. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iijbs.org/
Citation
The Indian International Journal of Buddhist Studies, 2014, v. 15, p. 229-248 How to Cite?
AbstractSince Kumārajīva translated the Vajracchedikā Prajñāpāramitā Sūtra (Diamond Sūtra) into Chinese in 402, it has become one of the most important and widely circulated sūtras of Chinese Buddhism. Over 2,000 manuscripts (scribed and printed) of the Diamond Sūtra were found in the Dunhuang “Library Cave”; one manuscript of the Diamond Sūtra, now on display at the British Museum, is the world's oldest and most comprehensive intact printed book (Stein Collection Item no.S.P.2.). It is dated in the colophon, which reads: the 9th year of Xiantong (868) of the Tang Dynasty. Due to its importance for the history of Chinese Buddhism and the development of printing technology, it has attracted widespread academic attention. In this paper, I will focus on the artistic traditions of the manuscript, examining the S.P.2. Diamond Sūtra from three perspectives: (1) the painting style of the frontispiece; (2) the calligraphy style of the engraved characters; and (3) the government official stone engraver. Through study of the painting and calligraphic styles of Wu Daozi and Liu Gongquan of the Tang dynasty, this paper shows that the woodblock print S.P.2 was created under the influence of the Chang’an artistic tradition. There is evidence of two government official engravers’ names, Qiang Yan (強演) and Shao Jianhe (邵建和), inscribed on the colophon of the stone rubbings Diamond Sūtra written by Liu Gongquan (柳公權). The workshop team established the model for the woodblock print by collaborative artwork from contemporary master painters, calligraphers, and court engravers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197670
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsui, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-29T08:38:46Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-29T08:38:46Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationThe Indian International Journal of Buddhist Studies, 2014, v. 15, p. 229-248en_US
dc.identifier.issn0972-4893-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197670-
dc.description.abstractSince Kumārajīva translated the Vajracchedikā Prajñāpāramitā Sūtra (Diamond Sūtra) into Chinese in 402, it has become one of the most important and widely circulated sūtras of Chinese Buddhism. Over 2,000 manuscripts (scribed and printed) of the Diamond Sūtra were found in the Dunhuang “Library Cave”; one manuscript of the Diamond Sūtra, now on display at the British Museum, is the world's oldest and most comprehensive intact printed book (Stein Collection Item no.S.P.2.). It is dated in the colophon, which reads: the 9th year of Xiantong (868) of the Tang Dynasty. Due to its importance for the history of Chinese Buddhism and the development of printing technology, it has attracted widespread academic attention. In this paper, I will focus on the artistic traditions of the manuscript, examining the S.P.2. Diamond Sūtra from three perspectives: (1) the painting style of the frontispiece; (2) the calligraphy style of the engraved characters; and (3) the government official stone engraver. Through study of the painting and calligraphic styles of Wu Daozi and Liu Gongquan of the Tang dynasty, this paper shows that the woodblock print S.P.2 was created under the influence of the Chang’an artistic tradition. There is evidence of two government official engravers’ names, Qiang Yan (強演) and Shao Jianhe (邵建和), inscribed on the colophon of the stone rubbings Diamond Sūtra written by Liu Gongquan (柳公權). The workshop team established the model for the woodblock print by collaborative artwork from contemporary master painters, calligraphers, and court engravers.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBhikkhu Jagadish Kashyap Institute of Buddhist and Asian Studies, Aditya-Shyam Trust. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iijbs.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe Indian International Journal of Buddhist Studiesen_US
dc.titleRe-examining The Diamond Sūtra Manuscript S.P.2 And Sacred Book Culture In The Tang Dynastyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTsui, C: chunghui@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.hkuros228797en_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.spage229-
dc.identifier.epage248-
dc.publisher.placeVaranasi, Indiaen_US

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