postgraduate thesis: Composing for chinese instrumental ensemble : a practitioner's perspective

TitleComposing for chinese instrumental ensemble : a practitioner's perspective
Authors
Advisors
Advisor(s):Chan, HY
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Ng, K. [伍敬彬]. (2014). Composing for chinese instrumental ensemble : a practitioner's perspective. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5194792
AbstractThis thesis aims to offer a practitioner’s perspective of composition for the Chinese instrumental ensemble of the twenty-first century. Chinese instrumental music composition has appeared in the concert hall in China since the beginning of the twentieth century. Modeled on western classical music, modern Chinese instrumental music has undergone a series of development and reformation that aimed to merge the Chinese and western musical ideas and techniques. The very role of the composer and the notion of concert-hall practice were being emphasized, whereas various ingrained characters of traditional instruments, such as music-making conventions, instrumentation preferences, and certain ideology behind timbre, were overshadowed. Also attributed to such nature of Chinese instrumental music is that composers and performers are often in a quandary when juggling Chinese instrumental music conventions with a mindset framed by western classical music. Furthermore, in the current globalized/globalizing culture, Chinese instrumental composition is propelled by manifold musical influences. I intend to share the insight and to document the first-hand information acquired through the composition processes from a composer’s perspective. My sharing and documentation focus on the issues of incorporating idiomatic music materials from various Chinese instruments into original compositions, as well as on several matters concerning rehearsals and performances. Including six chapters, this thesis anthologizes six original works and discusses the composition strategies relevant to the distinctive instrumental combination of each. Chapter 1 presents an adaptation of a western symphonic poem for modern Chinese orchestra. Chapters 2 and 3 illustrate respectively a composition for a large Chinese wind and percussion ensemble and a composition for a large plucked-string ensemble. Chapters 4 and 5 cover two pieces of contrasting instrumentation, namely a mixed ensemble of fourteen instruments and a huqin sextet. Chapter 6 is about a multimedia composition with electronic soundtrack and installation art for seven players.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectComposition (Music)
Instrumental ensembles - Scores
Dept/ProgramMusic
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197560

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorChan, HY-
dc.contributor.authorNg, King-pan-
dc.contributor.author伍敬彬-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-27T23:16:44Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-27T23:16:44Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationNg, K. [伍敬彬]. (2014). Composing for chinese instrumental ensemble : a practitioner's perspective. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5194792-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197560-
dc.description.abstractThis thesis aims to offer a practitioner’s perspective of composition for the Chinese instrumental ensemble of the twenty-first century. Chinese instrumental music composition has appeared in the concert hall in China since the beginning of the twentieth century. Modeled on western classical music, modern Chinese instrumental music has undergone a series of development and reformation that aimed to merge the Chinese and western musical ideas and techniques. The very role of the composer and the notion of concert-hall practice were being emphasized, whereas various ingrained characters of traditional instruments, such as music-making conventions, instrumentation preferences, and certain ideology behind timbre, were overshadowed. Also attributed to such nature of Chinese instrumental music is that composers and performers are often in a quandary when juggling Chinese instrumental music conventions with a mindset framed by western classical music. Furthermore, in the current globalized/globalizing culture, Chinese instrumental composition is propelled by manifold musical influences. I intend to share the insight and to document the first-hand information acquired through the composition processes from a composer’s perspective. My sharing and documentation focus on the issues of incorporating idiomatic music materials from various Chinese instruments into original compositions, as well as on several matters concerning rehearsals and performances. Including six chapters, this thesis anthologizes six original works and discusses the composition strategies relevant to the distinctive instrumental combination of each. Chapter 1 presents an adaptation of a western symphonic poem for modern Chinese orchestra. Chapters 2 and 3 illustrate respectively a composition for a large Chinese wind and percussion ensemble and a composition for a large plucked-string ensemble. Chapters 4 and 5 cover two pieces of contrasting instrumentation, namely a mixed ensemble of fourteen instruments and a huqin sextet. Chapter 6 is about a multimedia composition with electronic soundtrack and installation art for seven players.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshComposition (Music)-
dc.subject.lcshInstrumental ensembles - Scores-
dc.titleComposing for chinese instrumental ensemble : a practitioner's perspective-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5194792-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineMusic-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5194792-

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