File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Early environmental determinants of asthma risk in a high-risk birth cohort.

TitleEarly environmental determinants of asthma risk in a high-risk birth cohort.
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PAI
Citation
Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 2008, v. 19 n. 6, p. 483-489 How to Cite?
AbstractEnvironmental exposures during early life have been suggested to have the greatest impact on childhood asthma. Our aim was to evaluate the risk factors associated with asthma at age 7 yr in a high-risk cohort that participated in a randomized controlled study on the primary prevention of asthma. Indoor exposures were characterized before birth and at 2 weeks, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 months after birth and again at 7 yr. Nasal scrapings for respiratory viruses were done at the same intervals during the first 2 yr. At age 7, the children were assessed by a pediatric allergist and had allergy skin tests. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to evaluate the effect of exposures on asthma for the entire cohort with adjustment for group allocation. In addition to the lower risk of asthma in the intervention group, we found a higher prevalence of asthma at age 7 for males, those having a positive history of asthma in mother, father, or older siblings, for children residing in Winnipeg and for atopic subjects. Upon adjustment for intervention group assignment and baseline factors, significant environmental risk factors during year 1 included dog ownership and respiratory syncytial viral infection detected at 12 months while maternal smoking was protective. Dog ownership was a significant risk factor in year 2, but highly correlated with dog ownership in year 1. Indoor environmental exposures during year 7 were not associated with asthma at age 7. Maternal smoking at year 7 was associated with a reduced risk of asthma at 7 yr. Early-life exposures were more important determinants than those in later years. A 'window of opportunity' exists for intervention measures to be applied.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197220
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.947
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.689
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, MMWen_US
dc.contributor.authorHegele, RGen_US
dc.contributor.authorDimich-Ward, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorFerguson, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchulzer, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-23T02:27:31Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-23T02:27:31Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Allergy and Immunology, 2008, v. 19 n. 6, p. 483-489en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-6157-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197220-
dc.description.abstractEnvironmental exposures during early life have been suggested to have the greatest impact on childhood asthma. Our aim was to evaluate the risk factors associated with asthma at age 7 yr in a high-risk cohort that participated in a randomized controlled study on the primary prevention of asthma. Indoor exposures were characterized before birth and at 2 weeks, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 months after birth and again at 7 yr. Nasal scrapings for respiratory viruses were done at the same intervals during the first 2 yr. At age 7, the children were assessed by a pediatric allergist and had allergy skin tests. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to evaluate the effect of exposures on asthma for the entire cohort with adjustment for group allocation. In addition to the lower risk of asthma in the intervention group, we found a higher prevalence of asthma at age 7 for males, those having a positive history of asthma in mother, father, or older siblings, for children residing in Winnipeg and for atopic subjects. Upon adjustment for intervention group assignment and baseline factors, significant environmental risk factors during year 1 included dog ownership and respiratory syncytial viral infection detected at 12 months while maternal smoking was protective. Dog ownership was a significant risk factor in year 2, but highly correlated with dog ownership in year 1. Indoor environmental exposures during year 7 were not associated with asthma at age 7. Maternal smoking at year 7 was associated with a reduced risk of asthma at 7 yr. Early-life exposures were more important determinants than those in later years. A 'window of opportunity' exists for intervention measures to be applied.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PAI-
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Allergy and Immunologyen_US
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subject.meshAllergens - immunology-
dc.subject.meshAsthma - etiology - immunology - prevention and control-
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposure-
dc.titleEarly environmental determinants of asthma risk in a high-risk birth cohort.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, MMW: mmwchan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1399-3038.2007.00689.x-
dc.identifier.pmid18266835-
dc.identifier.hkuros162551en_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage483en_US
dc.identifier.epage489en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000258582000003-
dc.publisher.placeDenmark-
dc.identifier.f10001104579-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats