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Article: Marketized private tutoring as a supplement to regular schooling: Liberal Studies and the shadow sector in Hong Kong secondary education

TitleMarketized private tutoring as a supplement to regular schooling: Liberal Studies and the shadow sector in Hong Kong secondary education
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00220272.asp
Citation
Journal of Curriculum Studies, 2014, v. 46 n. 3, p. 361-388 How to Cite?
AbstractAround the world, increasing numbers of students receive after-school private supplementary tutoring. Such tutoring may be provided through informal channels or by companies; and it may be received one-to-one, in small groups, or in large classes. The tutoring is commonly called shadow education since its content mimics that of regular schooling. The spread of shadow education is part of a global shift of balance with increased roles for the private sector. Hong Kong is among the societies in which shadow education enrolment rates are particularly high. Much shadow education focuses on techniques for performance in external examinations, and is not consistent with the emphases stressed by teachers and the government. This paper focuses on a newly-introduced subject called Liberal Studies in which the tensions are especially visible. Although the official curriculum emphasizes creativity and critical thinking, many students have sought large-class tutoring focused on formulae for passing examinations. Interviews exposed the needs that the students felt were not being met in their schooling. The findings illustrate some of the complexities in relationships between the public and private sectors. Viewed in a wider context, the paper illuminates some of the mechanisms and effects of marketization which are increasingly evident globally.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196809
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.076
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.329
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, C-
dc.contributor.authorBray, TM-
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-29T03:42:26Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-29T03:42:26Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Curriculum Studies, 2014, v. 46 n. 3, p. 361-388-
dc.identifier.issn0022-0272-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196809-
dc.description.abstractAround the world, increasing numbers of students receive after-school private supplementary tutoring. Such tutoring may be provided through informal channels or by companies; and it may be received one-to-one, in small groups, or in large classes. The tutoring is commonly called shadow education since its content mimics that of regular schooling. The spread of shadow education is part of a global shift of balance with increased roles for the private sector. Hong Kong is among the societies in which shadow education enrolment rates are particularly high. Much shadow education focuses on techniques for performance in external examinations, and is not consistent with the emphases stressed by teachers and the government. This paper focuses on a newly-introduced subject called Liberal Studies in which the tensions are especially visible. Although the official curriculum emphasizes creativity and critical thinking, many students have sought large-class tutoring focused on formulae for passing examinations. Interviews exposed the needs that the students felt were not being met in their schooling. The findings illustrate some of the complexities in relationships between the public and private sectors. Viewed in a wider context, the paper illuminates some of the mechanisms and effects of marketization which are increasingly evident globally.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00220272.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Curriculum Studies-
dc.rightsThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Journal of Curriculum Studies on 17 Feb 2014, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00220272.2014.883553-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleMarketized private tutoring as a supplement to regular schooling: Liberal Studies and the shadow sector in Hong Kong secondary education-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailBray, TM: mbray@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityBray, TM=rp00888-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00220272.2014.883553-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84899639735-
dc.identifier.hkuros228682-
dc.identifier.volume46-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage361-
dc.identifier.epage388-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000334722700006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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