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Article: Recent advances in understanding the roles of Cdk5 in synaptic plasticity

TitleRecent advances in understanding the roles of Cdk5 in synaptic plasticity
Authors
Issue Date2009
Citation
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Basis of Disease, 2009, v. 1792 n. 8, p. 741-745 How to Cite?
AbstractThe molecular composition of the postsynaptic density is modified during synaptic plasticity, which forms the molecular basis of learning and memory. Such changes in synaptic composition depends in part on the intricate regulation of phosphorylation of specific proteins via different protein kinases, including a serine/threonine kinase, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). However, the mechanisms underlying the involvement of Cdk5 in neural plasticity remain elusive. Recently, the identification of a number of synaptic proteins as substrates or interacting proteins with Cdk5 provides important clues on how this kinase modulates the efficacy of synaptic transmission. In this review, we summarize the recent findings to illustrate the multi-faceted roles of Cdk5 in synaptic plasticity through affecting dendritic spine formation, ion channel conductance, protein expression, and transcription in the postsynaptic neurons. Importantly, dysregulation of Cdk5 has been linked to Alzheimer's disease, which involves perturbations in synaptic functions and memory formation. Understanding the mechanisms by which Cdk5 regulates synaptic plasticity may therefore provide important insights in the design of novel therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196707
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.158
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.718
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, K-O-
dc.contributor.authorIp, NY-
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-24T02:10:35Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-24T02:10:35Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Basis of Disease, 2009, v. 1792 n. 8, p. 741-745-
dc.identifier.issn0925-4439-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196707-
dc.description.abstractThe molecular composition of the postsynaptic density is modified during synaptic plasticity, which forms the molecular basis of learning and memory. Such changes in synaptic composition depends in part on the intricate regulation of phosphorylation of specific proteins via different protein kinases, including a serine/threonine kinase, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). However, the mechanisms underlying the involvement of Cdk5 in neural plasticity remain elusive. Recently, the identification of a number of synaptic proteins as substrates or interacting proteins with Cdk5 provides important clues on how this kinase modulates the efficacy of synaptic transmission. In this review, we summarize the recent findings to illustrate the multi-faceted roles of Cdk5 in synaptic plasticity through affecting dendritic spine formation, ion channel conductance, protein expression, and transcription in the postsynaptic neurons. Importantly, dysregulation of Cdk5 has been linked to Alzheimer's disease, which involves perturbations in synaptic functions and memory formation. Understanding the mechanisms by which Cdk5 regulates synaptic plasticity may therefore provide important insights in the design of novel therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Basis of Disease-
dc.titleRecent advances in understanding the roles of Cdk5 in synaptic plasticity-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbadis.2009.05.001-
dc.identifier.pmid19442718-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67651121690-
dc.identifier.volume1792-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage741-
dc.identifier.epage745-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269112500001-

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