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Conference Paper: Incidence of chest wall paresthesia after needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery for palmar hyperhidrosis

TitleIncidence of chest wall paresthesia after needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery for palmar hyperhidrosis
Authors
Issue Date2005
Citation
European Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery, 2005, v. 27 n. 2, p. 313-319 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Chest wall paresthesia is a reported sequela of thoracotomy and Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS) which is distinct from wound pain. Although needlescopic VATS confers less post-operative pain and better cosmesis, the incidence of paresthesia after needlescopic VATS has not been quantified. Methods: For homogeneity of the patient cohort, we studied 50 patients who received bilateral needlescopic VATS sympathectomy (T2-T4 excision) for palmar hyperhidrosis using 2 or 3 mm instruments during a 36-month period at a single institute. A standard questionnaire was administered by telephone interview, with 34 patents responding (68.0%). The median post-operative observation time was 16.5 months (range: 10-40 months). Collected data were compared with a historical group who received conventional VATS using 10 mm ports. Results: Paresthetic discomfort distinguishable from wound pain was described by 17 patients (50.0%). The most common descriptions were of 'bloating' (41.2%), 'pins and needles' (35.3%), or 'numbness' (23.5%) in the chest wall. The paresthesia resolved in less than two months in 12 patients (70.6%), but was still felt for over 12 months in three patients (17.6%). Post-operative paresthesia and pain did not impact on patient satisfaction with the surgery, whereas compensatory hyperhidrosis in 24 patients (70.6%) did (P=0.001). The rates and characteristics of the paresthesia following needlescopic VATS are similar to those observed after conventional VATS. Conclusions: Chest wall paresthesia affects a significant but previously overlooked proportion of patients following needlescopic VATS, but has minimal impact on post-operative satisfaction. Needlescopic VATS offers no apparent advantage over conventional VATS with regard to paresthesia. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196648
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.803
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.568
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSihoe, ADL-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CSK-
dc.contributor.authorLai, H-K-
dc.contributor.authorLee, T-W-
dc.contributor.authorThung, K-H-
dc.contributor.authorYim, APC-
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-24T02:10:30Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-24T02:10:30Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery, 2005, v. 27 n. 2, p. 313-319-
dc.identifier.issn1010-7940-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196648-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Chest wall paresthesia is a reported sequela of thoracotomy and Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS) which is distinct from wound pain. Although needlescopic VATS confers less post-operative pain and better cosmesis, the incidence of paresthesia after needlescopic VATS has not been quantified. Methods: For homogeneity of the patient cohort, we studied 50 patients who received bilateral needlescopic VATS sympathectomy (T2-T4 excision) for palmar hyperhidrosis using 2 or 3 mm instruments during a 36-month period at a single institute. A standard questionnaire was administered by telephone interview, with 34 patents responding (68.0%). The median post-operative observation time was 16.5 months (range: 10-40 months). Collected data were compared with a historical group who received conventional VATS using 10 mm ports. Results: Paresthetic discomfort distinguishable from wound pain was described by 17 patients (50.0%). The most common descriptions were of 'bloating' (41.2%), 'pins and needles' (35.3%), or 'numbness' (23.5%) in the chest wall. The paresthesia resolved in less than two months in 12 patients (70.6%), but was still felt for over 12 months in three patients (17.6%). Post-operative paresthesia and pain did not impact on patient satisfaction with the surgery, whereas compensatory hyperhidrosis in 24 patients (70.6%) did (P=0.001). The rates and characteristics of the paresthesia following needlescopic VATS are similar to those observed after conventional VATS. Conclusions: Chest wall paresthesia affects a significant but previously overlooked proportion of patients following needlescopic VATS, but has minimal impact on post-operative satisfaction. Needlescopic VATS offers no apparent advantage over conventional VATS with regard to paresthesia. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery-
dc.titleIncidence of chest wall paresthesia after needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery for palmar hyperhidrosis-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ejcts.2004.10.038-
dc.identifier.pmid15691688-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-13244296834-
dc.identifier.volume27-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage313-
dc.identifier.epage319-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000227328300032-

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