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Article: Morbidity pattern in private and public sectors of family medicine/general practice in a dual health care system

TitleMorbidity pattern in private and public sectors of family medicine/general practice in a dual health care system
Authors
Issue Date1998
Citation
Hong Kong Practitioner, 1998, v. 20 n. 1, p. 3-15 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To study the differences and their implication on the morbidity pattern in family medicine (FM)/general practice (GP) in the private and public sectors of a dual health care system. Design: A survey on morbidity of patients diagnosed by family physicians (FPs)/general practitioners (GPs) in Hong Kong. A convenient sample of FPs/GPs in private practice and a random sample of doctors in government outpatient clinics were recruited for the study. Subjects: All patients seen by the recruited FPs/GPs in 4 one-week periods over the four seasons in 1994. Main outcome measures: The diagnoses or problems identified by FPs/GPs at each patient encounter. Results: The patients in the public sector were mostly from the lower social classes, of older age, more females, with more chronic illnesses, and with more problems per consultation. Public-sector FPs/GPs could afford less time for each patient, made less psycho-social diagnoses, had to tolerate more diagnostic uncertainty, and had more difficulty in thorough understanding of their patients' background. Apart from acute primary care health problems, private FPs/GPs encountered more health problems requiring thorough evaluation and explanation. Conclusion: Morbidity pattern differs in the private and public sectors. The difference may be related to the job nature and work load of the respective physicians.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196638
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.101

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWun, YT-
dc.contributor.authorLee, A-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KKC-
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-24T02:10:29Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-24T02:10:29Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Practitioner, 1998, v. 20 n. 1, p. 3-15-
dc.identifier.issn1027-3948-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196638-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To study the differences and their implication on the morbidity pattern in family medicine (FM)/general practice (GP) in the private and public sectors of a dual health care system. Design: A survey on morbidity of patients diagnosed by family physicians (FPs)/general practitioners (GPs) in Hong Kong. A convenient sample of FPs/GPs in private practice and a random sample of doctors in government outpatient clinics were recruited for the study. Subjects: All patients seen by the recruited FPs/GPs in 4 one-week periods over the four seasons in 1994. Main outcome measures: The diagnoses or problems identified by FPs/GPs at each patient encounter. Results: The patients in the public sector were mostly from the lower social classes, of older age, more females, with more chronic illnesses, and with more problems per consultation. Public-sector FPs/GPs could afford less time for each patient, made less psycho-social diagnoses, had to tolerate more diagnostic uncertainty, and had more difficulty in thorough understanding of their patients' background. Apart from acute primary care health problems, private FPs/GPs encountered more health problems requiring thorough evaluation and explanation. Conclusion: Morbidity pattern differs in the private and public sectors. The difference may be related to the job nature and work load of the respective physicians.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Practitioner-
dc.titleMorbidity pattern in private and public sectors of family medicine/general practice in a dual health care system-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031917374-
dc.identifier.volume20-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage3-
dc.identifier.epage15-

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