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postgraduate thesis: The Joseon Fine Art Exhibition under Japanese colonial rule

TitleThe Joseon Fine Art Exhibition under Japanese colonial rule
Authors
Advisors
Advisor(s):Koon, YW
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Lee, Y. Y. [이윤영]. (2013). The Joseon Fine Art Exhibition under Japanese colonial rule. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5177357
AbstractAt the turn of the twentieth century, as Japan expanded its territory by colonizing other Asian nations, the Japan-Korea Annexation Treaty was signed in 1910 and Korea lost its sovereignty. In political turmoil, the formation of national and cultural identity was constantly challenged, and the struggle was not argued in words alone. It was also embedded in various types of visual cultures, with narratives changing under the shifting political climate. This thesis focuses on paintings exhibited in the Joseon Mijeon (조선미술전람회 The Joseon Fine Art Exhibition) (1922-1944), which was supervised by the Japanese colonial government and dominated, in the beginning, by Japanese artists and jurors. By closely examining paintings of ‘local color (향토색)’ and ‘provincial color (지방색),’ which emphasized the essence of a “Korean” culture that accentuated its Otherness based on cultural stereotypes, the thesis explores how representations of Korea both differentiated it from Japan and characterized its relationship with the West. In order to legitimize its colonial rule, politically driven ideologies of pan-Asianism (the pursuit of a unified Asia) and Japanese Orientalism (the imperialistic perception of the rest of Asia) were evident in the state-approved arts. The thesis explores how the tension of modern Japan as both promoting an egalitarian Asia and asserting its superiority within Asia was shown in the popular images that circulated in the form of postcards, manga, magazine illustrations, and more importantly in paintings. Moreover, this project examines both the artists who actively submitted works to the Joseon Mijeon and the group of artists who opposed the Joseon Mijeon and worked outside of the state-approved system to consider the complexity of responses by artists who sought to be both modern and Korean under Japanese colonial rule.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectArt, Korean - 20th century - Exhibitions
Art, Japanese - 1868- - Exhibitions
Dept/ProgramFine Arts
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196493

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorKoon, YW-
dc.contributor.author이윤영-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Yoon Yung-
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-11T23:14:31Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-11T23:14:31Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationLee, Y. Y. [이윤영]. (2013). The Joseon Fine Art Exhibition under Japanese colonial rule. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5177357-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196493-
dc.description.abstractAt the turn of the twentieth century, as Japan expanded its territory by colonizing other Asian nations, the Japan-Korea Annexation Treaty was signed in 1910 and Korea lost its sovereignty. In political turmoil, the formation of national and cultural identity was constantly challenged, and the struggle was not argued in words alone. It was also embedded in various types of visual cultures, with narratives changing under the shifting political climate. This thesis focuses on paintings exhibited in the Joseon Mijeon (조선미술전람회 The Joseon Fine Art Exhibition) (1922-1944), which was supervised by the Japanese colonial government and dominated, in the beginning, by Japanese artists and jurors. By closely examining paintings of ‘local color (향토색)’ and ‘provincial color (지방색),’ which emphasized the essence of a “Korean” culture that accentuated its Otherness based on cultural stereotypes, the thesis explores how representations of Korea both differentiated it from Japan and characterized its relationship with the West. In order to legitimize its colonial rule, politically driven ideologies of pan-Asianism (the pursuit of a unified Asia) and Japanese Orientalism (the imperialistic perception of the rest of Asia) were evident in the state-approved arts. The thesis explores how the tension of modern Japan as both promoting an egalitarian Asia and asserting its superiority within Asia was shown in the popular images that circulated in the form of postcards, manga, magazine illustrations, and more importantly in paintings. Moreover, this project examines both the artists who actively submitted works to the Joseon Mijeon and the group of artists who opposed the Joseon Mijeon and worked outside of the state-approved system to consider the complexity of responses by artists who sought to be both modern and Korean under Japanese colonial rule.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshArt, Korean - 20th century - Exhibitions-
dc.subject.lcshArt, Japanese - 1868- - Exhibitions-
dc.titleThe Joseon Fine Art Exhibition under Japanese colonial rule-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5177357-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineFine Arts-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5177357-

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