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postgraduate thesis: Visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease : a multi-modal MRI investigation

TitleVisual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease : a multi-modal MRI investigation
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Yao, N. [姚乃琳]. (2013). Visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease : a multi-modal MRI investigation. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5177323
AbstractBackground Visual hallucinations (VH) are an important non-motor complication of Parkinson’s disease (PD) which carries a negative prognosis, but their biological basis is unclear. Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to evaluate structural and functional brain mechanisms underpinning VH in PD. Methods To assess cerebral microstructure and resting functional activities in patients with idiopathic PD and VH, I compared PD patients with VH (PDVH) and PD patients without VH (PDnonVH), while healthy controls (HC) were also recruited for comparison. Diffusion tensor imaging was used to calculate mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA). Structural MRI was used to calculate voxel-based intensity of grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) across the entire brain and compared among groups. Furthermore, functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, acquired during rest, was processed to calculate the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) and functional connectivity (FC) to inform a model of VH. In addition, hippocampal volume, shape, mean diffusivity and FC across the whole brain was further examined. Hippocampal dependent visual spatial memory performance was compared between groups, and predicted correlations with hippocampal microstructural indices and VH severity were tested. Results In the first study, PDVH had lower FA than both PDnonVH and HC in the right occipital lobe and left parietal lobe, but increased FA in the right infero-medial fronto-occipital fasciculus and posterior inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Moreover, PDVH patients showed less GM volume compared to PDnonVH in the right lingual gyrus of the occipital lobe. In the second study, PDVH patients compared to non-hallucinators showed lower ALFF in occipital lobes, with greater ALFF in temporo-parietal region, limbic lobe and right cerebellum. The PDVH group also showed alteration in functional connectivity between occipital region and corticostriatal regions. Finally in the third study, although there were no gross hippocampal volume and shape differences across groups, individuals with PDVH had higher diffusivity in hippocampus than PDnonVH and HC. Both PD groups had significantly poorer visuospatial memory compared to HC. Poorer visuospatial memory was correlated with higher hippocampal diffusivity in HC and more severe VH in the PDVH group.FC between hippocampus and primary visual cortex, dorsal/ventral visual pathways was also lower in PDVH than other groups, whereas FC between hippocampus and default mode network regions was greater in PDVH group compared to others. Conclusion Compared to PDnonVH groups, the PDVH group had multiple structural deficits in primary and associative visual cortices. In term of hemodynamic activity, the PDVH group had lower ALFF in occipital lobe, but greater ALFF in regions that comprise the dorsal visual pathway. Moreover, this lower ALFF in the primary visual cortex was accompanied by lower functional connectivity across components of the ventral/dorsal visual pathway in the PDVH group compared to the PDnonVH group. Moreover, evidence supporting a specific role for the hippocampus in PDVH was obtained. In the absence of gross macrostructural anomalies, hippocampal microstructure and functional connectivity was compromised in PDVH. I observed an association between visuospatial memory and hippocampal integrity and suggest that hippocampal pathology and consequent disruption in visuospatial memory plays a key contribution to VH in PD. Thus, in the PDVH group, "bottom-up" primary visual cortex and “top-down” visual association pathways and attentional networks appear to be disrupted.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectParkinson's disease - Magnetic resonance imaging
Parkinson's disease - Complications
Dept/ProgramPsychiatry
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196477

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYao, Nailin-
dc.contributor.author姚乃琳-
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-11T23:14:29Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-11T23:14:29Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationYao, N. [姚乃琳]. (2013). Visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease : a multi-modal MRI investigation. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5177323-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196477-
dc.description.abstractBackground Visual hallucinations (VH) are an important non-motor complication of Parkinson’s disease (PD) which carries a negative prognosis, but their biological basis is unclear. Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to evaluate structural and functional brain mechanisms underpinning VH in PD. Methods To assess cerebral microstructure and resting functional activities in patients with idiopathic PD and VH, I compared PD patients with VH (PDVH) and PD patients without VH (PDnonVH), while healthy controls (HC) were also recruited for comparison. Diffusion tensor imaging was used to calculate mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA). Structural MRI was used to calculate voxel-based intensity of grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) across the entire brain and compared among groups. Furthermore, functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, acquired during rest, was processed to calculate the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) and functional connectivity (FC) to inform a model of VH. In addition, hippocampal volume, shape, mean diffusivity and FC across the whole brain was further examined. Hippocampal dependent visual spatial memory performance was compared between groups, and predicted correlations with hippocampal microstructural indices and VH severity were tested. Results In the first study, PDVH had lower FA than both PDnonVH and HC in the right occipital lobe and left parietal lobe, but increased FA in the right infero-medial fronto-occipital fasciculus and posterior inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Moreover, PDVH patients showed less GM volume compared to PDnonVH in the right lingual gyrus of the occipital lobe. In the second study, PDVH patients compared to non-hallucinators showed lower ALFF in occipital lobes, with greater ALFF in temporo-parietal region, limbic lobe and right cerebellum. The PDVH group also showed alteration in functional connectivity between occipital region and corticostriatal regions. Finally in the third study, although there were no gross hippocampal volume and shape differences across groups, individuals with PDVH had higher diffusivity in hippocampus than PDnonVH and HC. Both PD groups had significantly poorer visuospatial memory compared to HC. Poorer visuospatial memory was correlated with higher hippocampal diffusivity in HC and more severe VH in the PDVH group.FC between hippocampus and primary visual cortex, dorsal/ventral visual pathways was also lower in PDVH than other groups, whereas FC between hippocampus and default mode network regions was greater in PDVH group compared to others. Conclusion Compared to PDnonVH groups, the PDVH group had multiple structural deficits in primary and associative visual cortices. In term of hemodynamic activity, the PDVH group had lower ALFF in occipital lobe, but greater ALFF in regions that comprise the dorsal visual pathway. Moreover, this lower ALFF in the primary visual cortex was accompanied by lower functional connectivity across components of the ventral/dorsal visual pathway in the PDVH group compared to the PDnonVH group. Moreover, evidence supporting a specific role for the hippocampus in PDVH was obtained. In the absence of gross macrostructural anomalies, hippocampal microstructure and functional connectivity was compromised in PDVH. I observed an association between visuospatial memory and hippocampal integrity and suggest that hippocampal pathology and consequent disruption in visuospatial memory plays a key contribution to VH in PD. Thus, in the PDVH group, "bottom-up" primary visual cortex and “top-down” visual association pathways and attentional networks appear to be disrupted.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshParkinson's disease - Magnetic resonance imaging -
dc.subject.lcshParkinson's disease - Complications-
dc.titleVisual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease : a multi-modal MRI investigation-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5177323-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePsychiatry-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5177323-

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