File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

postgraduate thesis: Climate change impacts on the serpulid tubeworm Hydroides elegans : a biomineralization perspective

TitleClimate change impacts on the serpulid tubeworm Hydroides elegans : a biomineralization perspective
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Chan, B. [陳辯宸]. (2013). Climate change impacts on the serpulid tubeworm Hydroides elegans : a biomineralization perspective. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5177307
AbstractAtmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has increased due to human activity from a pre-industrial value of about 280 ppm to the present level of 399 ppm. The ocean acts as an important natural carbon sink that effectively removes 1/3 of this anthropogenic CO2 from the atmosphere, buffering global warming effects. However, the dissolution of CO2 causes a dramatic change in seawater chemistry and ultimately results in the phenomenon commonly known as "ocean acidification" (OA). As a consequence, the pH value and the saturation states for calcium carbonate decline in the surface seawater, posing a threat to calcareous marine organisms that build their shells using exquisite biomineralization mechanisms. Biological minerals produced by marine organisms are compositionally and structurally more complex than geological minerals. Although changes in biomineral formation in response to OA has been intensively investigated, the features of calcified products in terms of their composition, architectures and mechanical properties have been overlooked in climate change research. The tubeworm is a favourite marine model organism in larval biology. Its life cycle is well understood hence provides a good opportunity to study OA impacts on the stochastic early life. In addition, the model enables comprehensive observation of the sophisticated biomineralization events. In this thesis, four studies on the biomineralization of Hydroides elegans, using a multidisciplinary collaborative approach combining larval biology and material science were conducted. (1) The tube mineral composition at different juvenile stages (4, 11, 18, 25 days) were characterized. (2) The impacts of different predicted OA scenarios (pH 8.1, 7.9, 7.6, and 7.4) on the resultant calcification products were compared. (3) A multiple-stressor investigation of OA (pH 8.1 and 7.8), reduced salinity (33 ‰ and 27 ‰) and increased temperature (25 °C and 29 °C) was conducted to further determine the more environmentally realistic OA impacts. (4) Calcification sites were examined by using a microscopy approach The main findings from each study were: (1) H. elegans produced both calcite and aragonite forms of CaCO3, which have distinctive physical and chemical properties. Thus, the tubeworm serves as an interesting model for studying OA impacts on biomineralization. The early juvenile stages are expected to be more sensitive to OA than the later life stages because the juvenile tubes are rich in aragonite and amorphous calcium carbonate. (2) Under experimental OA conditions, the composition and architecture of the tube structures were adversely affected, ultimately producing tubes with weaker mechanical properties. (3) Warming appeared to strengthen the tube structures and mitigated the adverse OA effects. (4) Calcification sites correlated to regions with higher pH values of 8.5 - 9.0. These regions may be sensitive to OA and should be further analyzed to study the mechanisms of OA impacts on calcification. This series of experiments study biomineralization and larval biology using a variety of modern multidisciplinary approaches provided new insights into the impacts of OA and climate change impacts on marine organisms and also helped us to project which species might adapt or succumb to future scenarios.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectBiomineralization
Ocean acidification - Environmental aspects
Tube worms
Dept/ProgramBiological Sciences
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196468

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Bin-san-
dc.contributor.author陳辯宸-
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-11T23:14:27Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-11T23:14:27Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationChan, B. [陳辯宸]. (2013). Climate change impacts on the serpulid tubeworm Hydroides elegans : a biomineralization perspective. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5177307-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196468-
dc.description.abstractAtmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has increased due to human activity from a pre-industrial value of about 280 ppm to the present level of 399 ppm. The ocean acts as an important natural carbon sink that effectively removes 1/3 of this anthropogenic CO2 from the atmosphere, buffering global warming effects. However, the dissolution of CO2 causes a dramatic change in seawater chemistry and ultimately results in the phenomenon commonly known as "ocean acidification" (OA). As a consequence, the pH value and the saturation states for calcium carbonate decline in the surface seawater, posing a threat to calcareous marine organisms that build their shells using exquisite biomineralization mechanisms. Biological minerals produced by marine organisms are compositionally and structurally more complex than geological minerals. Although changes in biomineral formation in response to OA has been intensively investigated, the features of calcified products in terms of their composition, architectures and mechanical properties have been overlooked in climate change research. The tubeworm is a favourite marine model organism in larval biology. Its life cycle is well understood hence provides a good opportunity to study OA impacts on the stochastic early life. In addition, the model enables comprehensive observation of the sophisticated biomineralization events. In this thesis, four studies on the biomineralization of Hydroides elegans, using a multidisciplinary collaborative approach combining larval biology and material science were conducted. (1) The tube mineral composition at different juvenile stages (4, 11, 18, 25 days) were characterized. (2) The impacts of different predicted OA scenarios (pH 8.1, 7.9, 7.6, and 7.4) on the resultant calcification products were compared. (3) A multiple-stressor investigation of OA (pH 8.1 and 7.8), reduced salinity (33 ‰ and 27 ‰) and increased temperature (25 °C and 29 °C) was conducted to further determine the more environmentally realistic OA impacts. (4) Calcification sites were examined by using a microscopy approach The main findings from each study were: (1) H. elegans produced both calcite and aragonite forms of CaCO3, which have distinctive physical and chemical properties. Thus, the tubeworm serves as an interesting model for studying OA impacts on biomineralization. The early juvenile stages are expected to be more sensitive to OA than the later life stages because the juvenile tubes are rich in aragonite and amorphous calcium carbonate. (2) Under experimental OA conditions, the composition and architecture of the tube structures were adversely affected, ultimately producing tubes with weaker mechanical properties. (3) Warming appeared to strengthen the tube structures and mitigated the adverse OA effects. (4) Calcification sites correlated to regions with higher pH values of 8.5 - 9.0. These regions may be sensitive to OA and should be further analyzed to study the mechanisms of OA impacts on calcification. This series of experiments study biomineralization and larval biology using a variety of modern multidisciplinary approaches provided new insights into the impacts of OA and climate change impacts on marine organisms and also helped us to project which species might adapt or succumb to future scenarios.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshBiomineralization-
dc.subject.lcshOcean acidification - Environmental aspects-
dc.subject.lcshTube worms-
dc.titleClimate change impacts on the serpulid tubeworm Hydroides elegans : a biomineralization perspective-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5177307-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineBiological Sciences-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5177307-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats