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postgraduate thesis: Ecology and evolution of swine influenza virus in Sri Lanka

TitleEcology and evolution of swine influenza virus in Sri Lanka
Authors
Advisors
Advisor(s):Peiris, JSM
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Perera, K. V. H. K. K.. (2013). Ecology and evolution of swine influenza virus in Sri Lanka. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5177300
AbstractInfluenza A virus infections in pigs is a disease of concern to the swine industry and to the ecology and epidemiology of influenza viruses in humans. Pigs have been proposed as a “mixing vessel” for generation of pandemics via reassortment between avian and mammalian viruses. The H1N1pdm 2009 virus probably emerged from swine into humans though reassortment between the recent North American triple reassortant H1N2 swine viruses and Eurasian avian-like swine viruses. Swine influenza viruses of H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 subtypes have been regularly detected in pigs in most parts of the world. Nevertheless, ecological and virological data on swine influenza is not available in Sri Lanka, and indeed, little documented data is available in the South Asian continent. The swine population in Sri Lanka is about 80,000, and live pigs are not regularly imported to the country. Swine husbandry is largely confined to four neighboring administrative districts in the country. Systematic virological and serological surveillance carried in swine abattoirs in Sri Lanka during 2009-2013 detected H1N1pdm 2009 like virus in local herds. Infection in pigs followed each of the H1N1pdm 2009 outbreaks in humans; October 2009 – January 2010, October 2010 – February 2011 and November 2012 – March 2013, respectively. Genetic, phylogenetic, and epidemiologic analysis of the human, and swine influenza viruses indicated spillover events of H1N1pdm 2009 from humans into pigs, with self-limited transmission and extinction within pig herds. The data also indicated that although H1N1pdm 2009 was able to spill over from humans to swine, it is not ideally adapted to establish sustained transmission among swine in the absence of further reassortment with other swine influenza virus lineages. Theses finding might reflect characteristics of swine husbandry in Sri Lanka, which has a low density pig population and remains isolated from global swine influenza viruses because of the absence of regular cross-border and cross-continental movements of swine. In contrast to some other parts of the world, we failed to isolate established lineages of swine influenza viruses, viz. Classical, North American triple reassortant and European Avian lineages. Sero prevalence to these endemic swine viruses was largely absent in local swine herds. In vitro replicative kinetic study indicated that H1N1pdm 2009 viruses isolated from swine have undergone some adaptation to swine led to decreased fitness for replication in human cells.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectInfluenza A virus - Sri Lanka
Swine influenza - Sri Lanka
Dept/ProgramPublic Health
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196456

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorPeiris, JSM-
dc.contributor.authorPerera, Kumarapatti Vidanalage Harsha Kumara Kithsiri-
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-11T23:14:26Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-11T23:14:26Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationPerera, K. V. H. K. K.. (2013). Ecology and evolution of swine influenza virus in Sri Lanka. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5177300-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196456-
dc.description.abstractInfluenza A virus infections in pigs is a disease of concern to the swine industry and to the ecology and epidemiology of influenza viruses in humans. Pigs have been proposed as a “mixing vessel” for generation of pandemics via reassortment between avian and mammalian viruses. The H1N1pdm 2009 virus probably emerged from swine into humans though reassortment between the recent North American triple reassortant H1N2 swine viruses and Eurasian avian-like swine viruses. Swine influenza viruses of H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 subtypes have been regularly detected in pigs in most parts of the world. Nevertheless, ecological and virological data on swine influenza is not available in Sri Lanka, and indeed, little documented data is available in the South Asian continent. The swine population in Sri Lanka is about 80,000, and live pigs are not regularly imported to the country. Swine husbandry is largely confined to four neighboring administrative districts in the country. Systematic virological and serological surveillance carried in swine abattoirs in Sri Lanka during 2009-2013 detected H1N1pdm 2009 like virus in local herds. Infection in pigs followed each of the H1N1pdm 2009 outbreaks in humans; October 2009 – January 2010, October 2010 – February 2011 and November 2012 – March 2013, respectively. Genetic, phylogenetic, and epidemiologic analysis of the human, and swine influenza viruses indicated spillover events of H1N1pdm 2009 from humans into pigs, with self-limited transmission and extinction within pig herds. The data also indicated that although H1N1pdm 2009 was able to spill over from humans to swine, it is not ideally adapted to establish sustained transmission among swine in the absence of further reassortment with other swine influenza virus lineages. Theses finding might reflect characteristics of swine husbandry in Sri Lanka, which has a low density pig population and remains isolated from global swine influenza viruses because of the absence of regular cross-border and cross-continental movements of swine. In contrast to some other parts of the world, we failed to isolate established lineages of swine influenza viruses, viz. Classical, North American triple reassortant and European Avian lineages. Sero prevalence to these endemic swine viruses was largely absent in local swine herds. In vitro replicative kinetic study indicated that H1N1pdm 2009 viruses isolated from swine have undergone some adaptation to swine led to decreased fitness for replication in human cells.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshInfluenza A virus - Sri Lanka-
dc.subject.lcshSwine influenza - Sri Lanka-
dc.titleEcology and evolution of swine influenza virus in Sri Lanka-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5177300-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePublic Health-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5177300-

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