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Article: Temporal relation between top-down and bottom-up processing in lexical tone perception

TitleTemporal relation between top-down and bottom-up processing in lexical tone perception
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontiersin.org/behavioral_neuroscience/
Citation
Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 2014, v. 8 n. MAR, p. article no. 97 How to Cite?
AbstractSpeech perception entails both top-down processing that relies primarily on language experience and bottom-up processing that depends mainly on instant auditory input. Previous models of speech perception often claim that bottom-up processing occurs in an early time window, whereas top-down processing takes place in a late time window after stimulus onset. In this paper, we evaluated the temporal relation of both types of processing in lexical tone perception. We conducted a series of event-related potential (ERP) experiments that recruited Mandarin participants and adopted three experimental paradigms, namely dichotic listening, lexical decision with phonological priming, and semantic violation. By systematically analyzing the lateralization patterns of the early and late ERP components that are observed in these experiments, we discovered that: auditory processing of pitch variations in tones, as a bottom-up effect, elicited greater right hemisphere activation; in contrast, linguistic processing of lexical tones, as a top-down effect, elicited greater left hemisphere activation. We also found that both types of processing co-occurred in both the early (around 200 ms) and late (around 300–500 ms) time windows, which supported a parallel model of lexical tone perception. Unlike the previous view that language processing is special and performed by dedicated neural circuitry, our study have elucidated that language processing can be decomposed into general cognitive functions (e.g., sensory and memory) and share neural resources with these functions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196408
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.392
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.803
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShuai, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorGong, Ten_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-07T03:27:11Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-07T03:27:11Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 2014, v. 8 n. MAR, p. article no. 97en_US
dc.identifier.issn1662-5153-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196408-
dc.description.abstractSpeech perception entails both top-down processing that relies primarily on language experience and bottom-up processing that depends mainly on instant auditory input. Previous models of speech perception often claim that bottom-up processing occurs in an early time window, whereas top-down processing takes place in a late time window after stimulus onset. In this paper, we evaluated the temporal relation of both types of processing in lexical tone perception. We conducted a series of event-related potential (ERP) experiments that recruited Mandarin participants and adopted three experimental paradigms, namely dichotic listening, lexical decision with phonological priming, and semantic violation. By systematically analyzing the lateralization patterns of the early and late ERP components that are observed in these experiments, we discovered that: auditory processing of pitch variations in tones, as a bottom-up effect, elicited greater right hemisphere activation; in contrast, linguistic processing of lexical tones, as a top-down effect, elicited greater left hemisphere activation. We also found that both types of processing co-occurred in both the early (around 200 ms) and late (around 300–500 ms) time windows, which supported a parallel model of lexical tone perception. Unlike the previous view that language processing is special and performed by dedicated neural circuitry, our study have elucidated that language processing can be decomposed into general cognitive functions (e.g., sensory and memory) and share neural resources with these functions.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontiersin.org/behavioral_neuroscience/-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscienceen_US
dc.rightsThis Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. It is reproduced with permission.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleTemporal relation between top-down and bottom-up processing in lexical tone perceptionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGong, T: tgong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGong, T=rp01654en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00097-
dc.identifier.pmid24723863-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84896960257-
dc.identifier.hkuros228486en_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issueMAR-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 97-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 97-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000333329900001-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

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