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Article: State-Led Gentrification in Hong Kong

TitleState-Led Gentrification in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://usj.sagepub.com/
Citation
Urban Studies, 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractThe specificity of Hong Kong’s gentrification trajectory reflects its urban morphology, political institutions, and social and economic structure. While continuously renewing itself economically, much of the city’s inner urban area building stock is old and functionally obsolete, whilst nevertheless providing affordable, well-located housing for lower-income and disadvantaged groups and small-scale commercial clusters. Constrained redevelopment is not the result of economic decline but rather of formidable frictions that make land assembly and vacant possession of buildings difficult. Hong Kong’s executive-led, quasi democratic government articulates with the public ownership of land and its management through the leasehold system, and leads inner-city redevelopment through the Urban Renewal Authority (URA) supported by various institutional and statutory arrangements. (Re)development is favoured because it generates significant state revenue from physical and economic intensification of sites. Although gentrification is not an agenda of the URA, it is a significant outcome of its redevelopment activities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196141
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.934
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.567
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaGrange, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorPretorius, FIHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-28T07:40:30Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-28T07:40:30Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationUrban Studies, 2014en_US
dc.identifier.issn0042-0980en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196141-
dc.description.abstractThe specificity of Hong Kong’s gentrification trajectory reflects its urban morphology, political institutions, and social and economic structure. While continuously renewing itself economically, much of the city’s inner urban area building stock is old and functionally obsolete, whilst nevertheless providing affordable, well-located housing for lower-income and disadvantaged groups and small-scale commercial clusters. Constrained redevelopment is not the result of economic decline but rather of formidable frictions that make land assembly and vacant possession of buildings difficult. Hong Kong’s executive-led, quasi democratic government articulates with the public ownership of land and its management through the leasehold system, and leads inner-city redevelopment through the Urban Renewal Authority (URA) supported by various institutional and statutory arrangements. (Re)development is favoured because it generates significant state revenue from physical and economic intensification of sites. Although gentrification is not an agenda of the URA, it is a significant outcome of its redevelopment activities.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://usj.sagepub.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUrban Studiesen_US
dc.titleState-Led Gentrification in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPretorius, FIH: fredpre@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPretorius, FIH=rp01018en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0042098013513645-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84954533824-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000368732100004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US

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