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postgraduate thesis: Constructing climate policy : the European Union and China

TitleConstructing climate policy : the European Union and China
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Wong, N. [黃雅婷]. (2012). Constructing climate policy : the European Union and China. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4979924
AbstractClimate change as an impeding catastrophe has prompted heated debates on the sharing of mitigation responsibilities among nation states. How do climate protection norms come about to influence climate policy-making, especially in major greenhouse gases emitters—the European Union and China? This thesis sets out to examine from the economic, strategic and normative perspectives what considerations are underpinning climate policy-making in the world, the EU, and China. A constructivist approach was taken, with a stress on bottom-up normative influence and mutual constitution of the international and local contexts. Building on primary sources from the speech, policy directives and reports by both state and non-state actors and others, analysis was carried out with the assistance of scholarly literature from the field of political economy, international relations and global environmental politic. Energy policy is elucidated to show how climate policy is mainstreamed and how reconciliation is possible among competing considerations. Findings of this thesis indicate that economic competitiveness is the primary consideration factor. While strategic interests often go parallel with economic ones, normative considerations sometimes contradict economic competitiveness in the short-term. It is also found that openness of political system and international status and identity seem to govern the extent of normative influence on climate policy-making. Despite rhetorical commitment, China‘s growth imperative and strong belief in the “common but differentiated responsibilities” present great obstacles to adoption of climate protection norms. In Europe, recession gives rise to a two-fold challenge—to deliver promises of green growth and to prevent erosion of public support for climate actions. Finally, as the thesis strongly recognizes the agency of non-state actors and citizens, it draws a number of implications on how they can influence climate policy-making in Europe and China.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectEnvironmental policy - European Union countires
Environmental policy - China
Dept/ProgramModern Languages and Cultures
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196075

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Nga-ting-
dc.contributor.author黃雅婷-
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-28T07:05:40Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-28T07:05:40Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationWong, N. [黃雅婷]. (2012). Constructing climate policy : the European Union and China. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4979924-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196075-
dc.description.abstractClimate change as an impeding catastrophe has prompted heated debates on the sharing of mitigation responsibilities among nation states. How do climate protection norms come about to influence climate policy-making, especially in major greenhouse gases emitters—the European Union and China? This thesis sets out to examine from the economic, strategic and normative perspectives what considerations are underpinning climate policy-making in the world, the EU, and China. A constructivist approach was taken, with a stress on bottom-up normative influence and mutual constitution of the international and local contexts. Building on primary sources from the speech, policy directives and reports by both state and non-state actors and others, analysis was carried out with the assistance of scholarly literature from the field of political economy, international relations and global environmental politic. Energy policy is elucidated to show how climate policy is mainstreamed and how reconciliation is possible among competing considerations. Findings of this thesis indicate that economic competitiveness is the primary consideration factor. While strategic interests often go parallel with economic ones, normative considerations sometimes contradict economic competitiveness in the short-term. It is also found that openness of political system and international status and identity seem to govern the extent of normative influence on climate policy-making. Despite rhetorical commitment, China‘s growth imperative and strong belief in the “common but differentiated responsibilities” present great obstacles to adoption of climate protection norms. In Europe, recession gives rise to a two-fold challenge—to deliver promises of green growth and to prevent erosion of public support for climate actions. Finally, as the thesis strongly recognizes the agency of non-state actors and citizens, it draws a number of implications on how they can influence climate policy-making in Europe and China.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshEnvironmental policy - European Union countires-
dc.subject.lcshEnvironmental policy - China-
dc.titleConstructing climate policy : the European Union and China-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4979924-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineModern Languages and Cultures-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4979924-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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