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Article: Vector projectile imaging: time-resolved dynamic visualization of complex flow patterns

TitleVector projectile imaging: time-resolved dynamic visualization of complex flow patterns
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, 2014, v. 40 n. 9, p. 2295-2309 How to Cite?
AbstractAchieving non-invasive, accurate, and time-resolved imaging of vascular flow with spatiotemporal fluctuations is well acknowledged to be an ongoing challenge. In this article, we present a new ultrasound-based framework called vector projectile imaging (VPI) that can dynamically render complex flow patterns over an imaging view at millisecond time resolution. VPI is founded upon three principles: (i) high-frame-rate broad-view data acquisition (based on steered plane wave firings); (ii) flow vector estimation derived from multi-angle Doppler analysis (coupled with data regularization and least-squares fitting); (iii) dynamic visualization of color-encoded vector projectiles (with flow speckles displayed as adjunct). Calibration results showed that, using three transmit angles and three receive angles (–10°, 0°, +10° for both), VPI can consistently compute flow vectors in a multi-vessel phantom with three tubes positioned at different depths (1.5, 4, 6 cm), oriented at different angles (–10°, 0°, +10°), and of different sizes (2.2, 4.4, and 6.3 mm dilated diameter; 2.5 ml/s steady flow rate). The practical merit of VPI was further demonstrated through an anthropomorphic flow phantom investigation that considered both healthy and stenosed carotid bifurcation geometries. For the healthy bifurcation with 1.2 Hz carotid flow pulses, VPI was able to render multi-directional and spatiotemporally varying flow patterns (using 416 fps nominal frame rate, or 2.4 ms time resolution). In the case of stenosed bifurcation (50% eccentric narrowing), VPI enabled dynamic visualization of high-speed flow jet and recirculation zones. These findings suggest that VPI holds promise as a new tool for complex flow analysis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195912
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYiu, YSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, ACHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-21T02:19:27Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-21T02:19:27Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationUltrasound in Medicine and Biology, 2014, v. 40 n. 9, p. 2295-2309en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195912-
dc.description.abstractAchieving non-invasive, accurate, and time-resolved imaging of vascular flow with spatiotemporal fluctuations is well acknowledged to be an ongoing challenge. In this article, we present a new ultrasound-based framework called vector projectile imaging (VPI) that can dynamically render complex flow patterns over an imaging view at millisecond time resolution. VPI is founded upon three principles: (i) high-frame-rate broad-view data acquisition (based on steered plane wave firings); (ii) flow vector estimation derived from multi-angle Doppler analysis (coupled with data regularization and least-squares fitting); (iii) dynamic visualization of color-encoded vector projectiles (with flow speckles displayed as adjunct). Calibration results showed that, using three transmit angles and three receive angles (–10°, 0°, +10° for both), VPI can consistently compute flow vectors in a multi-vessel phantom with three tubes positioned at different depths (1.5, 4, 6 cm), oriented at different angles (–10°, 0°, +10°), and of different sizes (2.2, 4.4, and 6.3 mm dilated diameter; 2.5 ml/s steady flow rate). The practical merit of VPI was further demonstrated through an anthropomorphic flow phantom investigation that considered both healthy and stenosed carotid bifurcation geometries. For the healthy bifurcation with 1.2 Hz carotid flow pulses, VPI was able to render multi-directional and spatiotemporally varying flow patterns (using 416 fps nominal frame rate, or 2.4 ms time resolution). In the case of stenosed bifurcation (50% eccentric narrowing), VPI enabled dynamic visualization of high-speed flow jet and recirculation zones. These findings suggest that VPI holds promise as a new tool for complex flow analysis.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUltrasound in Medicine and Biologyen_US
dc.titleVector projectile imaging: time-resolved dynamic visualization of complex flow patternsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, YS: bysyiu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, SM: simonlsm@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYu, ACH: alfred.yu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYu, ACH=rp00657en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2014.03.014en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24972498-
dc.identifier.hkuros228301en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000341461100040-
dc.identifier.f1000718471493-

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