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Article: Subgingival microbiota of Sri Lankan tea labourers naïve to oral hygiene measures

TitleSubgingival microbiota of Sri Lankan tea labourers naïve to oral hygiene measures
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CPE
Citation
Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 2014, v. 41 n. 5, p. 433-441 How to Cite?
AbstractAim To characterize the subgingival microbiota within a cohort of adult males (n = 32) naïve to oral hygiene practices, and to compare the composition of bacterial taxa present in periodontal sites with various probing depths. Material and Methods Subgingival plaque samples were collected from single shallow pocket [pocket probing depth (PPD)≤3 mm] and deep pocket (PPD≥6 mm) sites from each subject. A polymerase chain reaction based strategy was used to construct a clone library of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes for each site. The sequences of ca. 30–60 plasmid clones were determined for each site to identify resident taxa. Microbial composition was compared using a variety of statistical and bioinformatics approaches. Results A total of 1887 cloned 16S rRNA gene sequences were analysed, which were assigned to 318 operational taxonomic units (98% identity cut-off). The subgingival microbiota was dominated by Firmicutes (69.8%), Proteobacteria (16.3%), and Fusobacteria (8.0%). The overall composition of microbial communities in shallow sites was significantly different from those within deep sites (∫-Libshuff, p < 0.001). Conclusions A taxonomically diverse subgingival microbiota was present within this cohort; however, the structures of the microbial communities present in the respective subjects exhibited limited variation. Deep and shallow sites contained notably different microbial compositions, but this was not correlated with the rate of periodontal progression.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195905
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.915
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.848
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhuang, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorWatt, RMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSteiner, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang-Hua, BHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorRamseier, CAen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-21T02:17:17Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-21T02:17:17Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Periodontology, 2014, v. 41 n. 5, p. 433-441en_US
dc.identifier.issn0303-6979-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195905-
dc.description.abstractAim To characterize the subgingival microbiota within a cohort of adult males (n = 32) naïve to oral hygiene practices, and to compare the composition of bacterial taxa present in periodontal sites with various probing depths. Material and Methods Subgingival plaque samples were collected from single shallow pocket [pocket probing depth (PPD)≤3 mm] and deep pocket (PPD≥6 mm) sites from each subject. A polymerase chain reaction based strategy was used to construct a clone library of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes for each site. The sequences of ca. 30–60 plasmid clones were determined for each site to identify resident taxa. Microbial composition was compared using a variety of statistical and bioinformatics approaches. Results A total of 1887 cloned 16S rRNA gene sequences were analysed, which were assigned to 318 operational taxonomic units (98% identity cut-off). The subgingival microbiota was dominated by Firmicutes (69.8%), Proteobacteria (16.3%), and Fusobacteria (8.0%). The overall composition of microbial communities in shallow sites was significantly different from those within deep sites (∫-Libshuff, p < 0.001). Conclusions A taxonomically diverse subgingival microbiota was present within this cohort; however, the structures of the microbial communities present in the respective subjects exhibited limited variation. Deep and shallow sites contained notably different microbial compositions, but this was not correlated with the rate of periodontal progression.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CPE-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Periodontologyen_US
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.titleSubgingival microbiota of Sri Lankan tea labourers naïve to oral hygiene measuresen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWatt, RM: rmwatt@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWang, R: wangren@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP: nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWatt, RM=rp00043en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jcpe.12230en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24460707-
dc.identifier.hkuros228328en_US
dc.identifier.volume41-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage433-
dc.identifier.epage441-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000333801900001-
dc.publisher.placeDenmark-

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