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Article: Role of fatty acid uptake and fatty acid β-oxidation in mediating insulin resistance in heart and skeletal muscle

TitleRole of fatty acid uptake and fatty acid β-oxidation in mediating insulin resistance in heart and skeletal muscle
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, 2010, v. 1801 n. 1, p. 1-22 How to Cite?
AbstractFatty acids are a major fuel source used to sustain contractile function in heart and oxidative skeletal muscle. To meet the energy demands of these muscles, the uptake and β-oxidation of fatty acids must be coordinately regulated in order to ensure an adequate, but not excessive, supply for mitochondrial β-oxidation. However, imbalance between fatty acid uptake and β-oxidation has the potential to contribute to muscle insulin resistance. The action of insulin is initiated by binding to its receptor and activation of the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase activity of the receptor, resulting in the initiation of an intracellular signaling cascade that eventually leads to insulin-mediated alterations in a number of cellular processes, including an increase in glucose transport. Accumulation of fatty acids and lipid metabolites (such as long chain acyl CoA, diacylglycerol, triacylglycerol, and/or ceramide) can lead to alterations in this insulin signaling pathway. An imbalance between fatty acid uptake and oxidation is believed to be responsible for this lipid accumulation, and is thought to be a major cause of insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes, due to lipid accumulation and inhibition of one or more steps in the insulin-signaling cascade. As a result, decreasing muscle fatty acid uptake can improve insulin sensitivity. However, the potential role of increasing fatty acid β-oxidation in the heart or skeletal muscle in order to prevent cytoplasmic lipid accumulation and decrease insulin resistance is controversial. While increased fatty acid β-oxidation may lower cytoplasmic lipid accumulation, increasing fatty acid β-oxidation can decrease muscle glucose metabolism, and incomplete fatty acid oxidation has the potential to also contribute to insulin resistance. In this review, we discuss the proposed mechanisms by which alterations in fatty acid uptake and oxidation contribute to insulin resistance, and how targeting fatty acid uptake and oxidation is a potential therapeutic approach to treat insulin resistance. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195856
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.779
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.467
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, L-
dc.contributor.authorKeung, W-
dc.contributor.authorSamokhvalov, V-
dc.contributor.authorWang, W-
dc.contributor.authorLopaschuk, GD-
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-19T01:46:10Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-19T01:46:10Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, 2010, v. 1801 n. 1, p. 1-22-
dc.identifier.issn1388-1981-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195856-
dc.description.abstractFatty acids are a major fuel source used to sustain contractile function in heart and oxidative skeletal muscle. To meet the energy demands of these muscles, the uptake and β-oxidation of fatty acids must be coordinately regulated in order to ensure an adequate, but not excessive, supply for mitochondrial β-oxidation. However, imbalance between fatty acid uptake and β-oxidation has the potential to contribute to muscle insulin resistance. The action of insulin is initiated by binding to its receptor and activation of the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase activity of the receptor, resulting in the initiation of an intracellular signaling cascade that eventually leads to insulin-mediated alterations in a number of cellular processes, including an increase in glucose transport. Accumulation of fatty acids and lipid metabolites (such as long chain acyl CoA, diacylglycerol, triacylglycerol, and/or ceramide) can lead to alterations in this insulin signaling pathway. An imbalance between fatty acid uptake and oxidation is believed to be responsible for this lipid accumulation, and is thought to be a major cause of insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes, due to lipid accumulation and inhibition of one or more steps in the insulin-signaling cascade. As a result, decreasing muscle fatty acid uptake can improve insulin sensitivity. However, the potential role of increasing fatty acid β-oxidation in the heart or skeletal muscle in order to prevent cytoplasmic lipid accumulation and decrease insulin resistance is controversial. While increased fatty acid β-oxidation may lower cytoplasmic lipid accumulation, increasing fatty acid β-oxidation can decrease muscle glucose metabolism, and incomplete fatty acid oxidation has the potential to also contribute to insulin resistance. In this review, we discuss the proposed mechanisms by which alterations in fatty acid uptake and oxidation contribute to insulin resistance, and how targeting fatty acid uptake and oxidation is a potential therapeutic approach to treat insulin resistance. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids-
dc.titleRole of fatty acid uptake and fatty acid β-oxidation in mediating insulin resistance in heart and skeletal muscle-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbalip.2009.09.014-
dc.identifier.pmid19782765-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-71549149354-
dc.identifier.volume1801-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage22-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000273153900001-

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