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Conference Paper: Coffee's beneficial effect on liver disease confirmed in NASH cohort, but only partially confirmation of in vitro pre-described differentially expressed genes in this patient cohort

TitleCoffee's beneficial effect on liver disease confirmed in NASH cohort, but only partially confirmation of in vitro pre-described differentially expressed genes in this patient cohort
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastro
Citation
The 2011 Digestive Disease Week (DDW), Chicago, IL., 7-11 May 2011. In Gastroenterology, 2011, v. 140 n. 5 suppl. 1, p. S-987, abstract Tu1921 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND; Coffee consumption has been associated with reduced liver fibrosis. Cultured cells and animal models have been used to identify differently-regulated genes that might explain this effect. No studies evaluating the effect of coffee consumption on liver gene expression in patients with liver disease have been reported. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD who completed questionnaires about coffee consumption were classified into 3 groups: none (n = 108), minimal-to moderate (<7 servings/week; n = 100) and daily (> or = 7 servings/week; n = 88). Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to assess the relationship between coffee consumption, various histologic parameters (e.g., steatosis, NAS activity score, ballooning, fibrosis), and potentially-relevant demographic variables (e.g., age, gender, BMI). RNA was also isolated from the liver biopsies of 48 of these subjects and subjected to microarray analysis using Affymetrix genechip HGU133-plus 2.0 to determine changes in liver gene expression associated with coffee consumption. 37% of these 48 patients had advanced fibrosis (F3-4) and 63% had early fibrosis (F0-1). Of the 23 patients who drank more than 7 cups/week, 18 (78%) had F0-1 fibrosis and 5 (22%) had F3-4 fibrosis (p=0.06). RESULTS: Coffee consumption was inversely associated with fibrosis severity in univariate analysis (p<0.012). In multivariate analysis, advanced fibrosis was positively correlated with age (p<0.04) and negatively correlated with coffee consumption (p<0.01). Coffee consumption was also associated with lower HbA1c values (r-0.17; p=0.01). However, the association of coffee consumption and lower fibrosis was independent of HbA1c (p=0.047). Consumption of other caffeine containing beverages, such as tea and soda, was not associated with fibrosis stage. Using linear regression analysis our microarray analysis confirmed a significant relationship between daily coffee consumption and lower expression of transforming growth factor -beta1(TGFβ1) and higher expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD), Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alfa (PPARα) and gluthation-S-transferase (GST). CONCLUSION: Coffee consumption of at least a cup a day appears protective against fibrosis progression in NAFLD. The underlying mechanism might involve induction of protective mechanism leading to reduced fibrogenesis.
DescriptionSession - Steatosis and Steatohepatitis / Q02 Steatohepatitis: Clinical
This journal suppl. entitled: 2011 DDW Abstract Supplement
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195777
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 18.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 7.170

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTillmann, HLen_US
dc.contributor.authorPang, HMHen_US
dc.contributor.authorDellinger, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorSuzuki, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuy, CDen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoylan, CAen_US
dc.contributor.authorPiercy, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorHauser, MAen_US
dc.contributor.authorDiehl, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorAbdelmalek, MF-
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-10T04:52:56Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-10T04:52:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2011 Digestive Disease Week (DDW), Chicago, IL., 7-11 May 2011. In Gastroenterology, 2011, v. 140 n. 5 suppl. 1, p. S-987, abstract Tu1921en_US
dc.identifier.issn0016-5085en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195777-
dc.descriptionSession - Steatosis and Steatohepatitis / Q02 Steatohepatitis: Clinical-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: 2011 DDW Abstract Supplement-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND; Coffee consumption has been associated with reduced liver fibrosis. Cultured cells and animal models have been used to identify differently-regulated genes that might explain this effect. No studies evaluating the effect of coffee consumption on liver gene expression in patients with liver disease have been reported. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD who completed questionnaires about coffee consumption were classified into 3 groups: none (n = 108), minimal-to moderate (<7 servings/week; n = 100) and daily (> or = 7 servings/week; n = 88). Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to assess the relationship between coffee consumption, various histologic parameters (e.g., steatosis, NAS activity score, ballooning, fibrosis), and potentially-relevant demographic variables (e.g., age, gender, BMI). RNA was also isolated from the liver biopsies of 48 of these subjects and subjected to microarray analysis using Affymetrix genechip HGU133-plus 2.0 to determine changes in liver gene expression associated with coffee consumption. 37% of these 48 patients had advanced fibrosis (F3-4) and 63% had early fibrosis (F0-1). Of the 23 patients who drank more than 7 cups/week, 18 (78%) had F0-1 fibrosis and 5 (22%) had F3-4 fibrosis (p=0.06). RESULTS: Coffee consumption was inversely associated with fibrosis severity in univariate analysis (p<0.012). In multivariate analysis, advanced fibrosis was positively correlated with age (p<0.04) and negatively correlated with coffee consumption (p<0.01). Coffee consumption was also associated with lower HbA1c values (r-0.17; p=0.01). However, the association of coffee consumption and lower fibrosis was independent of HbA1c (p=0.047). Consumption of other caffeine containing beverages, such as tea and soda, was not associated with fibrosis stage. Using linear regression analysis our microarray analysis confirmed a significant relationship between daily coffee consumption and lower expression of transforming growth factor -beta1(TGFβ1) and higher expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD), Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alfa (PPARα) and gluthation-S-transferase (GST). CONCLUSION: Coffee consumption of at least a cup a day appears protective against fibrosis progression in NAFLD. The underlying mechanism might involve induction of protective mechanism leading to reduced fibrogenesis.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastroen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGastroenterologyen_US
dc.titleCoffee's beneficial effect on liver disease confirmed in NASH cohort, but only partially confirmation of in vitro pre-described differentially expressed genes in this patient cohorten_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailPang, HMH: herbpang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPang, HMH=rp01857en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0016-5085(11)64090-0-
dc.identifier.volume140en_US
dc.identifier.spageS-987, abstract Tu1921en_US
dc.identifier.epageS-987, abstract Tu1921en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US

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