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Article: Breast feeding and early adolescent behaviour, self-esteem and depression: Hong Kong's 'Children of 1997' birth cohort

TitleBreast feeding and early adolescent behaviour, self-esteem and depression: Hong Kong's 'Children of 1997' birth cohort
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archdischild.com/
Citation
Archives of Disease in Childhood, 2013, v. 98 n. 11, p. 887-894 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Breast feeding may contribute to neurological development and hence mental health. However, associations from Western populations are unclear, and most likely confounded by socioeconomic position (SEP), making evidence from other sociocultural settings valuable. We examined whether breast feeding was associated with early adolescent emotional and behavioural problems, self-esteem and depressive symptoms in a non-Western developed setting, where socioeconomic patterning of breast feeding differs from but other postnatal characteristics are similar to Western settings. Design: The adjusted associations of breast feeding with emotional and behavioural problems assessed from parent-reported Rutter z-score at ∼11 years (n=5598, 67% follow-up), self-reported self-esteem z-score at ∼11 years (n=6937, 84%) and depressive symptoms assessed from self-reported Patient Health Questionnaire-9 z-score at ?13 years (n=5797, 70%) were examined using multivariable linear regression in a population-representative Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort, ' Children of 1997'. Results: Mothers from families with higher education tended to start but not sustain breast feeding, whereas migrant mothers tended to start and sustain breast feeding. Breast feeding for 3+ months had mostly null associations with Rutter score, self-esteem or depressive symptoms adjusted for sex, age, survey mode, SEP, parents' age, birth weight-for-gestational age, birth order and secondhand smoke exposure, although partial breast feeding for any length of time or exclusive breast feeding for <3 months was associated with poorer behaviour (higher Rutter z-score (0.10, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.16)) and lower self-esteem (-0.09, 95% CI -0.14 to -0.04). Conclusions: In a non-Western developed setting, breast feeding was inconsistently associated with several early adolescent mental health measures suggesting a reflection of setting specific unmeasured confounding.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195744
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.231
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.118
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, MKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-07T04:35:06Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-07T04:35:06Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationArchives of Disease in Childhood, 2013, v. 98 n. 11, p. 887-894en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-9888-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195744-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Breast feeding may contribute to neurological development and hence mental health. However, associations from Western populations are unclear, and most likely confounded by socioeconomic position (SEP), making evidence from other sociocultural settings valuable. We examined whether breast feeding was associated with early adolescent emotional and behavioural problems, self-esteem and depressive symptoms in a non-Western developed setting, where socioeconomic patterning of breast feeding differs from but other postnatal characteristics are similar to Western settings. Design: The adjusted associations of breast feeding with emotional and behavioural problems assessed from parent-reported Rutter z-score at ∼11 years (n=5598, 67% follow-up), self-reported self-esteem z-score at ∼11 years (n=6937, 84%) and depressive symptoms assessed from self-reported Patient Health Questionnaire-9 z-score at ?13 years (n=5797, 70%) were examined using multivariable linear regression in a population-representative Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort, ' Children of 1997'. Results: Mothers from families with higher education tended to start but not sustain breast feeding, whereas migrant mothers tended to start and sustain breast feeding. Breast feeding for 3+ months had mostly null associations with Rutter score, self-esteem or depressive symptoms adjusted for sex, age, survey mode, SEP, parents' age, birth weight-for-gestational age, birth order and secondhand smoke exposure, although partial breast feeding for any length of time or exclusive breast feeding for <3 months was associated with poorer behaviour (higher Rutter z-score (0.10, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.16)) and lower self-esteem (-0.09, 95% CI -0.14 to -0.04). Conclusions: In a non-Western developed setting, breast feeding was inconsistently associated with several early adolescent mental health measures suggesting a reflection of setting specific unmeasured confounding.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archdischild.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Disease in Childhooden_US
dc.rightsArchives of Disease in Childhood. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.-
dc.titleBreast feeding and early adolescent behaviour, self-esteem and depression: Hong Kong's 'Children of 1997' birth cohorten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKwok, MK: maggiek@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/archdischild-2013-304250en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24001956-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84885857686-
dc.identifier.hkuros228157en_US
dc.identifier.volume98en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage887en_US
dc.identifier.epage894en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000325542300016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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