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Article: Nicorandil as a novel therapy for advanced diabetic nephropathy in the eNOS-deficient mouse

TitleNicorandil as a novel therapy for advanced diabetic nephropathy in the eNOS-deficient mouse
Authors
Issue Date2012
Citation
American Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology, 2012, v. 302 n. 9, p. F1151-F1161 How to Cite?
AbstractNicorandil is an orally available drug that can act as a nitric oxide donor, an antioxidant, and an ATP-dependent K channel activator. We hypothesized that it may have a beneficial role in treating diabetic nephropathy. We administered nicorandil to a model of advanced diabetic nephropathy (the streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice lacking endothelial nitric oxide synthase, eNOSKO); controls included diabetic eNOS KO mice without nicorandil and nondiabetic eNOS KO mice treated with either nicorandil or vehicle. Mice were treated for 8 wk. Histology, blood pressure, and renal function were determined. Additional studies involved examining the effects of nicorandil on cultured human podocytes. Here, we found that nicorandil did not affect blood glucose levels, blood pressure, or systemic endothelial function, but significantly reduced proteinuria and glomerular injury (mesangiolysis and glomerulosclerosis). Nicorandil protected against podocyte loss and podocyte oxidative stress. Studies in cultured podocytes showed that nicorandil likely protects against glucose-mediated oxidant stress via the ATP-dependent K channel as opposed to its NO-stimulating effects. In conclusion, nicorandil may be beneficial in diabetic nephropathy by preserving podocyte function. We recommend clinical trials to determine whether nicorandil may benefit diabetic nephropathy or other conditions associated with podocyte dysfunction. © 2012 the American Physiological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195509
ISSN
2008 Impact Factor: 3.89
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTanabe, K-
dc.contributor.authorLanaspa, MA-
dc.contributor.authorKitagawa, W-
dc.contributor.authorRivard, CJ-
dc.contributor.authorMiyazaki, M-
dc.contributor.authorKlawitter, J-
dc.contributor.authorSchreiner, GF-
dc.contributor.authorSaleem, MA-
dc.contributor.authorMathieson, PW-
dc.contributor.authorMakino, H-
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, RJ-
dc.contributor.authorNakagawa, T-
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-28T06:12:15Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-28T06:12:15Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology, 2012, v. 302 n. 9, p. F1151-F1161-
dc.identifier.issn0363-6127-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195509-
dc.description.abstractNicorandil is an orally available drug that can act as a nitric oxide donor, an antioxidant, and an ATP-dependent K channel activator. We hypothesized that it may have a beneficial role in treating diabetic nephropathy. We administered nicorandil to a model of advanced diabetic nephropathy (the streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice lacking endothelial nitric oxide synthase, eNOSKO); controls included diabetic eNOS KO mice without nicorandil and nondiabetic eNOS KO mice treated with either nicorandil or vehicle. Mice were treated for 8 wk. Histology, blood pressure, and renal function were determined. Additional studies involved examining the effects of nicorandil on cultured human podocytes. Here, we found that nicorandil did not affect blood glucose levels, blood pressure, or systemic endothelial function, but significantly reduced proteinuria and glomerular injury (mesangiolysis and glomerulosclerosis). Nicorandil protected against podocyte loss and podocyte oxidative stress. Studies in cultured podocytes showed that nicorandil likely protects against glucose-mediated oxidant stress via the ATP-dependent K channel as opposed to its NO-stimulating effects. In conclusion, nicorandil may be beneficial in diabetic nephropathy by preserving podocyte function. We recommend clinical trials to determine whether nicorandil may benefit diabetic nephropathy or other conditions associated with podocyte dysfunction. © 2012 the American Physiological Society.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology-
dc.titleNicorandil as a novel therapy for advanced diabetic nephropathy in the eNOS-deficient mouse-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1152/ajprenal.00596.2011-
dc.identifier.pmid22338086-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84860540851-
dc.identifier.volume302-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spageF1151-
dc.identifier.epageF1161-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303681500012-

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