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Article: Animal models of systemic vasculitis

TitleAnimal models of systemic vasculitis
Authors
Issue Date1993
Citation
Journal of Autoimmunity, 1993, v. 6 n. 2, p. 251-264 How to Cite?
AbstractNecrotizing leucocytoclastic vasclitis in the histopathological hallmark of the small vessel systemic vasculitides (SV), a group of human diseases commonly associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA). Necrotizing vasculitis is seen in a number of experimental systems, but none of these provide an ideal animal model for human SV. Vasculitis occurs in serum sickness reactions; in murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus; in association with infection, particularly chronic viral infections; and after treatment with certain drugs or inflammatory mediators. 'Spontaneous' vasculitis has been reported in specific mouse strains, especially with ageing, and in some larger species. The size of vessel involved and the type of inflammatory cells predominating are variable in these experimental situations, and none of these models feature antibodies analogous to ANCA. We have recently reported that Brown Norway rats treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl2) develop necrotizing leucocytoclastic vasculitis, especially in the gut, and also develop antibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO) which recognize smilar determinants on MPO to those bound by a subset of ANCA. Transfer of serum from HgCl2-treated rats to naive animals does not induce tissue injury. Preliminary experiments using pooled immunoglobulin or an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody did not show useful therapeutic benefit from these treatments. HgCl2-induced vasculitis has weaknesses as an animal model of human SV, but is the only experimental model in which anti-MPO autoantibodies have so far been demonstrated, and therefore may be of particular relevance to ANCA-associated SV.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195421
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.76
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.971
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMathieson, PW-
dc.contributor.authorQasim, FJ-
dc.contributor.authorEsnault, VLM-
dc.contributor.authorOliveira, DBG-
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-28T06:12:07Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-28T06:12:07Z-
dc.date.issued1993-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Autoimmunity, 1993, v. 6 n. 2, p. 251-264-
dc.identifier.issn0896-8411-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195421-
dc.description.abstractNecrotizing leucocytoclastic vasclitis in the histopathological hallmark of the small vessel systemic vasculitides (SV), a group of human diseases commonly associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA). Necrotizing vasculitis is seen in a number of experimental systems, but none of these provide an ideal animal model for human SV. Vasculitis occurs in serum sickness reactions; in murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus; in association with infection, particularly chronic viral infections; and after treatment with certain drugs or inflammatory mediators. 'Spontaneous' vasculitis has been reported in specific mouse strains, especially with ageing, and in some larger species. The size of vessel involved and the type of inflammatory cells predominating are variable in these experimental situations, and none of these models feature antibodies analogous to ANCA. We have recently reported that Brown Norway rats treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl2) develop necrotizing leucocytoclastic vasculitis, especially in the gut, and also develop antibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO) which recognize smilar determinants on MPO to those bound by a subset of ANCA. Transfer of serum from HgCl2-treated rats to naive animals does not induce tissue injury. Preliminary experiments using pooled immunoglobulin or an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody did not show useful therapeutic benefit from these treatments. HgCl2-induced vasculitis has weaknesses as an animal model of human SV, but is the only experimental model in which anti-MPO autoantibodies have so far been demonstrated, and therefore may be of particular relevance to ANCA-associated SV.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Autoimmunity-
dc.titleAnimal models of systemic vasculitis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1006/jaut.1993.1022-
dc.identifier.pmid8388693-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027281257-
dc.identifier.volume6-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage251-
dc.identifier.epage264-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1993KX56400012-

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