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Article: T and B cell responses to neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens in systemic vasculitis

TitleT and B cell responses to neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens in systemic vasculitis
Authors
Issue Date1992
Citation
Clinical Immunology and Immunopathology, 1992, v. 63 n. 2, p. 135-141 How to Cite?
AbstractThe systemic vasculitides (SV) are characterized by the presence of autoantibodies to neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens (ANCA). The role of T cells in SV is uncertain. We studied human and murine T cell responses to human neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens in vitro. T cells from mice immunized with the neutrophil extract showed dose-dependent antigen-specific proliferation, restricted by the MHC class II E molecule. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) was not an important target antigen for murine T cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were obtained from 36 patients with SV, 31 before the start of immunosuppressive therapy, and from 11 healthy controls. T cell responses to the neutrophil extract in vitro did not differ between patients and controls: there were only low levels of antigen-specific proliferation, and this could not be amplified by in vitro selection. In 3 patients and 2 normals, PBLs were also tested after the depletion of CD8+ cells; this did not unmask T cell reactivity to neutrophil extract. The lack of demonstrable T cell reactivity to this antigen preparation may indicate that T cells do not play an important effector role in these diseases. A solid-phase spot ELISA was adapted to demonstrate autoantibody-producing B cells in vitro. Low numbers of ANCA-producing B cells could be demonstrated in the majority of patients. B cells producing antibody to MPO could be demonstrated in most patients and in three laboratory staff, but not in normals from outside the laboratory. In 2 patients, sequential B cell spot ELISAs were performed during the introduction of therapy, and autoantibody-producing B cells rapidly decreased in number. This assay may therefore be useful in monitoring the effects of treatment at the cellular level.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195354
ISSN
1998 Impact Factor: 2.047
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMathieson, PW-
dc.contributor.authorLockwood, CM-
dc.contributor.authorOliveira, DBG-
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-28T06:12:01Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-28T06:12:01Z-
dc.date.issued1992-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Immunology and Immunopathology, 1992, v. 63 n. 2, p. 135-141-
dc.identifier.issn0090-1229-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195354-
dc.description.abstractThe systemic vasculitides (SV) are characterized by the presence of autoantibodies to neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens (ANCA). The role of T cells in SV is uncertain. We studied human and murine T cell responses to human neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens in vitro. T cells from mice immunized with the neutrophil extract showed dose-dependent antigen-specific proliferation, restricted by the MHC class II E molecule. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) was not an important target antigen for murine T cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were obtained from 36 patients with SV, 31 before the start of immunosuppressive therapy, and from 11 healthy controls. T cell responses to the neutrophil extract in vitro did not differ between patients and controls: there were only low levels of antigen-specific proliferation, and this could not be amplified by in vitro selection. In 3 patients and 2 normals, PBLs were also tested after the depletion of CD8+ cells; this did not unmask T cell reactivity to neutrophil extract. The lack of demonstrable T cell reactivity to this antigen preparation may indicate that T cells do not play an important effector role in these diseases. A solid-phase spot ELISA was adapted to demonstrate autoantibody-producing B cells in vitro. Low numbers of ANCA-producing B cells could be demonstrated in the majority of patients. B cells producing antibody to MPO could be demonstrated in most patients and in three laboratory staff, but not in normals from outside the laboratory. In 2 patients, sequential B cell spot ELISAs were performed during the introduction of therapy, and autoantibody-producing B cells rapidly decreased in number. This assay may therefore be useful in monitoring the effects of treatment at the cellular level.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Immunology and Immunopathology-
dc.titleT and B cell responses to neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens in systemic vasculitis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0090-1229(92)90005-9-
dc.identifier.pmid1611716-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0026683169-
dc.identifier.volume63-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage135-
dc.identifier.epage141-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1992HP02400005-

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