File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Stem cell pluripotency: A cellular trait that depends on transcription factors, chromatin state and a checkpoint deficient cell cycle

TitleStem cell pluripotency: A cellular trait that depends on transcription factors, chromatin state and a checkpoint deficient cell cycle
Authors
Issue Date2009
Citation
Journal of Cellular Physiology, 2009, v. 221 n. 1, p. 10-17 How to Cite?
AbstractEmbryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells self-renew and are pluripotent. Differentiation of these cells can yield over 200 somatic cell types, making pluripotent cells an obvious source for regenerative medicine. Before the potential of these cells can be maximally harnessed for clinical applications, it will be necessary to understand the processes that maintain pluripotentiality and signal differentiation. Currently, three unique molecular properties distinguish pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells. These include a unique transcriptional hierarchy that sustains the pluripotent state during the process of self-renewal; a poised epigenetic state that maintains chromatin in a form ready for rapid cell fate decisions; and a cell cycle characterized by an extremely short gap 1 (G1) phase and the near absence of normal somatic cell checkpoint controls. Recently, B-MYB (MYBL2) was implicated in the gene regulation of two pluripotency factors and normal cell cycle progression. In this article, the three pluripotency properties and the potential role of B-Myb to regulate these processes will be discussed. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195200
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.155
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.842
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBoheler, KR-
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-25T01:40:18Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-25T01:40:18Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Cellular Physiology, 2009, v. 221 n. 1, p. 10-17-
dc.identifier.issn0021-9541-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195200-
dc.description.abstractEmbryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells self-renew and are pluripotent. Differentiation of these cells can yield over 200 somatic cell types, making pluripotent cells an obvious source for regenerative medicine. Before the potential of these cells can be maximally harnessed for clinical applications, it will be necessary to understand the processes that maintain pluripotentiality and signal differentiation. Currently, three unique molecular properties distinguish pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells. These include a unique transcriptional hierarchy that sustains the pluripotent state during the process of self-renewal; a poised epigenetic state that maintains chromatin in a form ready for rapid cell fate decisions; and a cell cycle characterized by an extremely short gap 1 (G1) phase and the near absence of normal somatic cell checkpoint controls. Recently, B-MYB (MYBL2) was implicated in the gene regulation of two pluripotency factors and normal cell cycle progression. In this article, the three pluripotency properties and the potential role of B-Myb to regulate these processes will be discussed. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Cellular Physiology-
dc.titleStem cell pluripotency: A cellular trait that depends on transcription factors, chromatin state and a checkpoint deficient cell cycle-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jcp.21866-
dc.identifier.pmid19562686-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-69249223435-
dc.identifier.volume221-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage10-
dc.identifier.epage17-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269573400003-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats