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Article: Characteristics of vaccine failures in a randomized placebo-controlled trial of inactivated influenza vaccine in children

TitleCharacteristics of vaccine failures in a randomized placebo-controlled trial of inactivated influenza vaccine in children
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pidj.com
Citation
The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 2014, v. 33 n. 2, p. e63–e66 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Infections occurring among vaccinated persons (vaccine failures) are known to occur in vaccines with imperfect efficacy. Failures among vaccinated children who were infected with vaccine-matched influenza B virus strain have not been adequately characterized. METHODS: Taking advantage of a randomized controlled trial of trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine (TIV), the viral shedding and clinical symptoms associated with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction-confirmed influenza B infection and serum hemaggluttination inhibiting antibody response to vaccine were compared between children 6 and 17 years receiving TIV and placebo. RESULTS: Vaccine failures were observed to show lower antibody response to TIV compared with other vaccine recipients. We did not find any evidence that vaccination reduced the severity or duration of clinical symptoms of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction-confirmed vaccine-matched influenza B infections. Vaccination was not observed to alter viral load or shedding duration. CONCLUSIONS: TIV was not observed to ameliorate clinical symptoms or viral shedding among vaccine failures compared with infected placebo recipients. Lower antibody response might have explained vaccine failure and also lack of effect in reducing clinical symptoms and viral shedding upon infection. Our results are based on a randomized controlled trial of split virus inactivated vaccine and may not be applicable to other vaccine types. Further studies in vaccine failure among children will be important in future vaccine development.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195099
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.587
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.416
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, S-
dc.contributor.authorNi, MY-
dc.contributor.authorFang, J-
dc.contributor.authorIp, DKM-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KH-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GM-
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM-
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJ-
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-24T01:50:19Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-24T01:50:19Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationThe Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 2014, v. 33 n. 2, p. e63–e66-
dc.identifier.issn0891-3668-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195099-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Infections occurring among vaccinated persons (vaccine failures) are known to occur in vaccines with imperfect efficacy. Failures among vaccinated children who were infected with vaccine-matched influenza B virus strain have not been adequately characterized. METHODS: Taking advantage of a randomized controlled trial of trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine (TIV), the viral shedding and clinical symptoms associated with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction-confirmed influenza B infection and serum hemaggluttination inhibiting antibody response to vaccine were compared between children 6 and 17 years receiving TIV and placebo. RESULTS: Vaccine failures were observed to show lower antibody response to TIV compared with other vaccine recipients. We did not find any evidence that vaccination reduced the severity or duration of clinical symptoms of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction-confirmed vaccine-matched influenza B infections. Vaccination was not observed to alter viral load or shedding duration. CONCLUSIONS: TIV was not observed to ameliorate clinical symptoms or viral shedding among vaccine failures compared with infected placebo recipients. Lower antibody response might have explained vaccine failure and also lack of effect in reducing clinical symptoms and viral shedding upon infection. Our results are based on a randomized controlled trial of split virus inactivated vaccine and may not be applicable to other vaccine types. Further studies in vaccine failure among children will be important in future vaccine development.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pidj.com-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal-
dc.titleCharacteristics of vaccine failures in a randomized placebo-controlled trial of inactivated influenza vaccine in childrenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailNi, MY: nimy@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFang, J: vickyf@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, DKM: dkmip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/INF.0000000000000064-
dc.identifier.pmid24061274-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3947204-
dc.identifier.hkuros228113-
dc.identifier.volume33-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spagee63-
dc.identifier.epagee66-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000331139100007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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