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Book Chapter: Complexity revisited: Pichi (Equatorial Guinea) and Spanish in contact

TitleComplexity revisited: Pichi (Equatorial Guinea) and Spanish in contact
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherBattlebridge
Citation
Complexity revisited: Pichi (Equatorial Guinea) and Spanish in contact. In Faraclas, NG & Klein, TB (Eds.), Simplicity and complexity in creoles and pidgins, p. 183-215. London: Battlebridge, 2009 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent attempts to prove the simplicity of Creoles with respect to non-Creoles have, like preceding ones concentrated on describing the assumed paucity of selected surface phenomena in quantitative terms. None of these accounts has taken into consideration that typically, Creoles are languages in contact. In the multilingual speech communities of West Africa but equally so in other regions, Creoles and Pidgins are in contact with lexifier superstrates, with historically unrelated non-lexifier superstrates and with a host of other, oftentimes substrate, languages. This paper attempts to provide answers to two questions. (1) Can we reconcile the complexity of the mixed grammar and lexicon of a language like Pichi with the notion of simplicity given that code-mixing of the type presented here forms an integral part of the linguistic system of the language? (2) Can we reconcile the restructuring (or “elaboration” in terms of the simplicity hypothesis) of Pichi grammar and lexicon through code-mixing within the short time-span of a hundred and seventy years with the notion that the youth of Creoles makes them simpler than non-Creoles.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195023
ISBN
Series/Report no.Westminster Creolistics series, 10

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYakpo, Ken_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-21T06:49:43Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-21T06:49:43Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationComplexity revisited: Pichi (Equatorial Guinea) and Spanish in contact. In Faraclas, NG & Klein, TB (Eds.), Simplicity and complexity in creoles and pidgins, p. 183-215. London: Battlebridge, 2009en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781903292150-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195023-
dc.description.abstractRecent attempts to prove the simplicity of Creoles with respect to non-Creoles have, like preceding ones concentrated on describing the assumed paucity of selected surface phenomena in quantitative terms. None of these accounts has taken into consideration that typically, Creoles are languages in contact. In the multilingual speech communities of West Africa but equally so in other regions, Creoles and Pidgins are in contact with lexifier superstrates, with historically unrelated non-lexifier superstrates and with a host of other, oftentimes substrate, languages. This paper attempts to provide answers to two questions. (1) Can we reconcile the complexity of the mixed grammar and lexicon of a language like Pichi with the notion of simplicity given that code-mixing of the type presented here forms an integral part of the linguistic system of the language? (2) Can we reconcile the restructuring (or “elaboration” in terms of the simplicity hypothesis) of Pichi grammar and lexicon through code-mixing within the short time-span of a hundred and seventy years with the notion that the youth of Creoles makes them simpler than non-Creoles.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBattlebridgeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSimplicity and complexity in creoles and pidginsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWestminster Creolistics series, 10-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleComplexity revisited: Pichi (Equatorial Guinea) and Spanish in contacten_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailYakpo, K: kofi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYakpo, K=rp01715en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros227892en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros228067-
dc.identifier.spage183en_US
dc.identifier.epage215en_US
dc.publisher.placeLondonen_US

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