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Article: Central nervous system and peripheral nerve growth factor provide trophic support critical to mature sensory neuronal survival

TitleCentral nervous system and peripheral nerve growth factor provide trophic support critical to mature sensory neuronal survival
Authors
Issue Date1985
Citation
Nature, 1985, v. 314 n. 6013, p. 751-752 How to Cite?
AbstractPrimary sensory neurones in cranial and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult animals are generally thought to be maintained through connections with their peripheral (but not central) targets by trophic factor(s) other than nerve growth factor (NGF). Damage to the peripheral process of sensory neurones results in a dramatic response or even death of the neurones, whereas axotomy (cutting) of the central process does not initiate profound reaction in these neurones. The development and maintenance of neurones are highly dependent on a supply of trophic agents produced by targets and retrogradely transported via the peripheral process to the cell body. NGF deprivation in fetal rodents produced either by exogenously administered antibodies or by those of maternal origin, results in death of DRG and of some cranial sensory neurones. However, as chronic NGF deprivation in neonatal or adult rodents produces little or no cell death, it has been assumed that some other trophic factor(s) derived from the peripheral target sustains sensory neurones in postnatal life. By inducing NGF deprivation by autoimmunizing guinea pigs with mouse NGF and/or by cutting the central root (process) of a DRG, we demonstrate here that under certain conditions DRG neurones require NGF and centrally derived trophic support. Our results indicate that sensory neurones are maintained by the trophic support provided by both peripheral and central targets. This support is mediated by NGF and other as yet unidentified trophic factors. The relative importance of the two target fields and NGF compared with other trophic factors changes during development.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194899
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 38.138
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 21.936
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJohnson Jr, EM-
dc.contributor.authorYip, HK-
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-17T08:41:12Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-17T08:41:12Z-
dc.date.issued1985-
dc.identifier.citationNature, 1985, v. 314 n. 6013, p. 751-752-
dc.identifier.issn0028-0836-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194899-
dc.description.abstractPrimary sensory neurones in cranial and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult animals are generally thought to be maintained through connections with their peripheral (but not central) targets by trophic factor(s) other than nerve growth factor (NGF). Damage to the peripheral process of sensory neurones results in a dramatic response or even death of the neurones, whereas axotomy (cutting) of the central process does not initiate profound reaction in these neurones. The development and maintenance of neurones are highly dependent on a supply of trophic agents produced by targets and retrogradely transported via the peripheral process to the cell body. NGF deprivation in fetal rodents produced either by exogenously administered antibodies or by those of maternal origin, results in death of DRG and of some cranial sensory neurones. However, as chronic NGF deprivation in neonatal or adult rodents produces little or no cell death, it has been assumed that some other trophic factor(s) derived from the peripheral target sustains sensory neurones in postnatal life. By inducing NGF deprivation by autoimmunizing guinea pigs with mouse NGF and/or by cutting the central root (process) of a DRG, we demonstrate here that under certain conditions DRG neurones require NGF and centrally derived trophic support. Our results indicate that sensory neurones are maintained by the trophic support provided by both peripheral and central targets. This support is mediated by NGF and other as yet unidentified trophic factors. The relative importance of the two target fields and NGF compared with other trophic factors changes during development.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofNature-
dc.titleCentral nervous system and peripheral nerve growth factor provide trophic support critical to mature sensory neuronal survival-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/314751a0-
dc.identifier.pmid3990804-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0021883927-
dc.identifier.volume314-
dc.identifier.issue6013-
dc.identifier.spage751-
dc.identifier.epage752-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1985AFX5600081-

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