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Conference Paper: Multi-modality Treatment Achieving Long-term Control for Inoperable Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of Trachea: A Case Report with Review of Medical Literature

TitleMulti-modality Treatment Achieving Long-term Control for Inoperable Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of Trachea: A Case Report with Review of Medical Literature
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherHong Kong College of Radiologists.
Citation
The 20th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Hong Kong College of Radiologists, Hong Kong, 27-28 October 2012. How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a tumor commonly originating from the salivary glands, but can rarely arise from the upper airway and be life threatening when causing central airway obstruction. While surgical resection is considered as the definitive treatment, ACC of the airway is frequently unresectable for a variety of reasons including tumor size, location, local extension or patient comorbidities. There is no consensus on the best treatment for locally advanced inoperable ACC of trachea. Objective: To present a case of inoperable ACC of trachea managed in our institute using multi-modality treatment and review on medical literature. Materials and Methods: A case report including history, relevant radiological findings and clinical photos. Results: Our patient, a 39-year-old lady, was diagnosed to have inoperable ACC of trachea in April 2010. She presented with progressive increase in shortness of breath and needed oxygen therapy. Chest X-ray noted total collapse of the left lung. CT revealed a soft tissue mass at left subcarinal region with involvement of the left main bronchus. There was no regional lymph node involvement or metastasis. Flexible bronchoscopy found tumor extending from carina down to left main bronchus with complete obstruction. Biopsy confirmed adenoid cystic carcinoma. She received multi-modality treatment: endoscopic stenting then radical radiotherapy using 3D conformal technique with 60Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks which was completed in July 2010. She has no evidence of disease progression or metastasis in interval CT imaging after a 24-month follow-up period. Conclusions: Most of the medical literature about this rare disease focused on surgical resection. Only few case reports are about radiotherapy with mixed results. Though ACC of the airway could be locally invasive and inoperable, this does not preclude a patient from receiving radical treatment. Multi-modality treatment using endoscopic intervention as a bridge before radical radiotherapy should be considered aiming at a better and long-term control.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194782

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, WLen_US
dc.contributor.authorSiu, WKSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, VHFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, TWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-17T02:09:49Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-17T02:09:49Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 20th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Hong Kong College of Radiologists, Hong Kong, 27-28 October 2012.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194782-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a tumor commonly originating from the salivary glands, but can rarely arise from the upper airway and be life threatening when causing central airway obstruction. While surgical resection is considered as the definitive treatment, ACC of the airway is frequently unresectable for a variety of reasons including tumor size, location, local extension or patient comorbidities. There is no consensus on the best treatment for locally advanced inoperable ACC of trachea. Objective: To present a case of inoperable ACC of trachea managed in our institute using multi-modality treatment and review on medical literature. Materials and Methods: A case report including history, relevant radiological findings and clinical photos. Results: Our patient, a 39-year-old lady, was diagnosed to have inoperable ACC of trachea in April 2010. She presented with progressive increase in shortness of breath and needed oxygen therapy. Chest X-ray noted total collapse of the left lung. CT revealed a soft tissue mass at left subcarinal region with involvement of the left main bronchus. There was no regional lymph node involvement or metastasis. Flexible bronchoscopy found tumor extending from carina down to left main bronchus with complete obstruction. Biopsy confirmed adenoid cystic carcinoma. She received multi-modality treatment: endoscopic stenting then radical radiotherapy using 3D conformal technique with 60Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks which was completed in July 2010. She has no evidence of disease progression or metastasis in interval CT imaging after a 24-month follow-up period. Conclusions: Most of the medical literature about this rare disease focused on surgical resection. Only few case reports are about radiotherapy with mixed results. Though ACC of the airway could be locally invasive and inoperable, this does not preclude a patient from receiving radical treatment. Multi-modality treatment using endoscopic intervention as a bridge before radical radiotherapy should be considered aiming at a better and long-term control.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong College of Radiologists.en_US
dc.relation.ispartof20th ASM of the Hong Kong College of Radiologists 2012en_US
dc.titleMulti-modality Treatment Achieving Long-term Control for Inoperable Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of Trachea: A Case Report with Review of Medical Literatureen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailSiu, WKS: siuwks@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, VHF: vhflee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, TW: ltw920@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, VHF=rp00264en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros227941en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_US

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