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Article: Can short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation help to reduce the institutionalization of stroke survivors?

TitleCan short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation help to reduce the institutionalization of stroke survivors?
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherDove Medical Press Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.dovepress.com/articles.php?journal_id=4
Citation
Clinical Interventions in Aging, 2014, v. 9, p. 283-291 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Stroke survivors may not be receiving optimal rehabilitation as a result of a shortage of hospital resources, and many of them are institutionalized. A rehabilitation program provided in a short-term residential care setting may help to fill the service gap. Objectives: The primary objectives of this study were, first, to examine whether there were significant differences in terms of rehabilitation outcomes at 1 year after admission to the rehabilitation program (defined as baseline) between those using short-term residential care (intervention group) and those using usual geriatric day hospital care (control group), and, second, to investigate whether lower 1-year institutionalization rates were observed in the intervention group than in the control group. Participants: 155 stroke survivors who completed at least the first follow-up at 4 months after baseline. Intervention: The intervention group was stroke survivors using self-financed short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation. The control group was stroke survivors using the usual care at a public geriatric day hospital. Measurements: Assessments were conducted by trained research assistants using structured questionnaires at baseline, 4 months, and 1 year after baseline. The primary outcome measures included Modified Barthel Index score, Mini-Mental Status Examination score, and the institutionalization rate. Results: Cognitive status (as measured by Mini-Mental Status Examination score) of patients in both groups could be maintained from 4 months to 1 year, whereas functional status (as measured by Modified Barthel Index score) of the patients could be further improved after 4 months up to 1 year. Meanwhile, insignificant between-group difference in rehabilitation outcomes was observed. The intervention participants had a significantly lower 1-year institutionalization rate (15.8%) than the control group (25.8%). Conclusion: Short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation promoted improvements in rehabilitation outcomes comparable with, if not better than, the usual care at geriatric day hospital. Furthermore, it had a significantly lower 1-year institutionalization rate. This type of service could be promoted to prevent institutionalization.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194779
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 1.824
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.865
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChau, PHen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, MWSen_US
dc.contributor.authorYeung, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, TWen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, OYen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-17T02:09:32Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-17T02:09:32Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Interventions in Aging, 2014, v. 9, p. 283-291en_US
dc.identifier.issn1176-9092-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194779-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Stroke survivors may not be receiving optimal rehabilitation as a result of a shortage of hospital resources, and many of them are institutionalized. A rehabilitation program provided in a short-term residential care setting may help to fill the service gap. Objectives: The primary objectives of this study were, first, to examine whether there were significant differences in terms of rehabilitation outcomes at 1 year after admission to the rehabilitation program (defined as baseline) between those using short-term residential care (intervention group) and those using usual geriatric day hospital care (control group), and, second, to investigate whether lower 1-year institutionalization rates were observed in the intervention group than in the control group. Participants: 155 stroke survivors who completed at least the first follow-up at 4 months after baseline. Intervention: The intervention group was stroke survivors using self-financed short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation. The control group was stroke survivors using the usual care at a public geriatric day hospital. Measurements: Assessments were conducted by trained research assistants using structured questionnaires at baseline, 4 months, and 1 year after baseline. The primary outcome measures included Modified Barthel Index score, Mini-Mental Status Examination score, and the institutionalization rate. Results: Cognitive status (as measured by Mini-Mental Status Examination score) of patients in both groups could be maintained from 4 months to 1 year, whereas functional status (as measured by Modified Barthel Index score) of the patients could be further improved after 4 months up to 1 year. Meanwhile, insignificant between-group difference in rehabilitation outcomes was observed. The intervention participants had a significantly lower 1-year institutionalization rate (15.8%) than the control group (25.8%). Conclusion: Short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation promoted improvements in rehabilitation outcomes comparable with, if not better than, the usual care at geriatric day hospital. Furthermore, it had a significantly lower 1-year institutionalization rate. This type of service could be promoted to prevent institutionalization.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDove Medical Press Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.dovepress.com/articles.php?journal_id=4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Interventions in Agingen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleCan short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation help to reduce the institutionalization of stroke survivors?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChau, PH: phpchau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, TW: ctszwai@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheng, OY: jojo1216@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChau, PH=rp00574en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.2147/CIA.S56532en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24550670-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3926706-
dc.identifier.hkuros228008en_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.spage283en_US
dc.identifier.epage291en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000331079000001-
dc.publisher.placeNew Zealanden_US

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