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postgraduate thesis: Addressing human factors in green office building design : occupant indoor environment quality survey in China

TitleAddressing human factors in green office building design : occupant indoor environment quality survey in China
Authors
Advisors
Advisor(s):Lau, SSY
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Gou, Z. [苟中华]. (2012). Addressing human factors in green office building design : occupant indoor environment quality survey in China. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5137947
AbstractAlthough requirements in relation to indoor environment quality (IEQ) have been made in green building rating systems such as LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) and China GBL (Green Building Label) to promote occupant comfort, health and productivity, in practice, very little is known about user perception and satisfaction with IEQ in green buildings. Recruitment and post-occupancy evaluation of 10 office buildings (8 green buildings and 2 non-green buildings) and their 696 occupants for this study generated a dataset representing many potential avenues of inquiry. From the occupant’s point of view, the green offices in buildings with whole-building certification were significantly more satisfactory than the non-green offices, whereas the green offices certified only on the basis of their interiors were comparable to the non-green offices. Mixed-mode ventilation performed much better than other ventilation types (central air-conditioning and split air-conditioning). However, the mixed-mode green buildings were invariably perceived to be too cold in winter. A correlation model showed that green building users tended to appreciate a well ventilated, daylit, and quiet indoor environment for their health and productivity. The findings in the study made critical suggestions with regard to pursuing green building certification and addressing human factors in sustainable building design and research. The strengths and weaknesses of this study were discussed to inform future studies.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectSustainable architecture - China - Design and construction
Office buildings - Design and construction - Environmental aspects - China
Dept/ProgramArchitecture
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194619

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorLau, SSY-
dc.contributor.authorGou, Zhonghua-
dc.contributor.author苟中华-
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-14T23:10:57Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-14T23:10:57Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationGou, Z. [苟中华]. (2012). Addressing human factors in green office building design : occupant indoor environment quality survey in China. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5137947-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194619-
dc.description.abstractAlthough requirements in relation to indoor environment quality (IEQ) have been made in green building rating systems such as LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) and China GBL (Green Building Label) to promote occupant comfort, health and productivity, in practice, very little is known about user perception and satisfaction with IEQ in green buildings. Recruitment and post-occupancy evaluation of 10 office buildings (8 green buildings and 2 non-green buildings) and their 696 occupants for this study generated a dataset representing many potential avenues of inquiry. From the occupant’s point of view, the green offices in buildings with whole-building certification were significantly more satisfactory than the non-green offices, whereas the green offices certified only on the basis of their interiors were comparable to the non-green offices. Mixed-mode ventilation performed much better than other ventilation types (central air-conditioning and split air-conditioning). However, the mixed-mode green buildings were invariably perceived to be too cold in winter. A correlation model showed that green building users tended to appreciate a well ventilated, daylit, and quiet indoor environment for their health and productivity. The findings in the study made critical suggestions with regard to pursuing green building certification and addressing human factors in sustainable building design and research. The strengths and weaknesses of this study were discussed to inform future studies.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshSustainable architecture - China - Design and construction-
dc.subject.lcshOffice buildings - Design and construction - Environmental aspects - China-
dc.titleAddressing human factors in green office building design : occupant indoor environment quality survey in China-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5137947-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineArchitecture-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5137947-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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