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Article: Design and evaluation of two blended learning approaches: Lessons learned

TitleDesign and evaluation of two blended learning approaches: Lessons learned
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherASCILITE. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet.html
Citation
Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 2011, v. 27 n. 8, p. 1319-1337 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this paper, we share two blended learning approaches used at the National Institute of Education in Singapore. We have been using these two approaches in the last twelve years in many courses ranging from the diploma to graduate programs. For the first blended learning approach, we integrated one asynchronous communication tool with face to face tutorials, classroom discussions, and a reflection session. For the second blended learning approach, we integrated two asynchronous tools with face to face tutorials in a course. We discuss the theoretical foundation of the two blended learning approaches. In addition, we share insights from these two blended learning approaches, based on the students' data (online postings, questionnaires, reflection logs, and interviews), as well as our own reflections. Finally, we describe and discuss several important lessons learned that could inform the design of future instructional strategies in implementing blended learning in university teaching and learning settings.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194339
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.798
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.327

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, WS-
dc.contributor.authorHew, KF-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-30T03:32:28Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-30T03:32:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationAustralasian Journal of Educational Technology, 2011, v. 27 n. 8, p. 1319-1337-
dc.identifier.issn1449-5554-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194339-
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, we share two blended learning approaches used at the National Institute of Education in Singapore. We have been using these two approaches in the last twelve years in many courses ranging from the diploma to graduate programs. For the first blended learning approach, we integrated one asynchronous communication tool with face to face tutorials, classroom discussions, and a reflection session. For the second blended learning approach, we integrated two asynchronous tools with face to face tutorials in a course. We discuss the theoretical foundation of the two blended learning approaches. In addition, we share insights from these two blended learning approaches, based on the students' data (online postings, questionnaires, reflection logs, and interviews), as well as our own reflections. Finally, we describe and discuss several important lessons learned that could inform the design of future instructional strategies in implementing blended learning in university teaching and learning settings.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherASCILITE. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet.html-
dc.relation.ispartofAustralasian Journal of Educational Technology-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleDesign and evaluation of two blended learning approaches: Lessons learned-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84855411201-
dc.identifier.hkuros244635-
dc.identifier.volume27-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage1319-
dc.identifier.epage1337-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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