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Article: Autonomic dysfunction in older people

TitleAutonomic dysfunction in older people
Authors
Issue Date2011
Citation
Reviews in Clinical Gerontology, 2011, v. 21 n. 1, p. 28-44 How to Cite?
AbstractSummary The autonomic nervous system comprises the sympathetic, parasympathetic and enteric nervous systems and plays an integral role in homeostasis. This includes cardiovascular and temperature control, glucose metabolism, gastrointestinal and reproductive function and increasing evidence to support its involvement in the inflammatory response to infection and cancer. Ageing is associated with autonomic dysfunction, and many clinical syndromes associated with older adults are due to inadequate autonomic responses to physiological stressors. The aim of this review is to explore the relationship between autonomic dysfunction and ageing illustrated with examples of maladaptive autonomic responses in a variety of different clinical syndromes including an exploration of autonomic cellular changes. Appropriate investigation and management strategies are outlined, recognizing the fine balance needed to improve symptoms without creating further medical complications. © Cambridge University Press 2010.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194304
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.245

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMarigold, JRG-
dc.contributor.authorArias, M-
dc.contributor.authorVassallo, M-
dc.contributor.authorAllen, SC-
dc.contributor.authorKwan, JS-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-30T03:32:25Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-30T03:32:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationReviews in Clinical Gerontology, 2011, v. 21 n. 1, p. 28-44-
dc.identifier.issn0959-2598-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194304-
dc.description.abstractSummary The autonomic nervous system comprises the sympathetic, parasympathetic and enteric nervous systems and plays an integral role in homeostasis. This includes cardiovascular and temperature control, glucose metabolism, gastrointestinal and reproductive function and increasing evidence to support its involvement in the inflammatory response to infection and cancer. Ageing is associated with autonomic dysfunction, and many clinical syndromes associated with older adults are due to inadequate autonomic responses to physiological stressors. The aim of this review is to explore the relationship between autonomic dysfunction and ageing illustrated with examples of maladaptive autonomic responses in a variety of different clinical syndromes including an exploration of autonomic cellular changes. Appropriate investigation and management strategies are outlined, recognizing the fine balance needed to improve symptoms without creating further medical complications. © Cambridge University Press 2010.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofReviews in Clinical Gerontology-
dc.titleAutonomic dysfunction in older people-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0959259810000286-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79951945983-
dc.identifier.volume21-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage28-
dc.identifier.epage44-

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