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Article: Students' and teachers' use of Facebook

TitleStudents' and teachers' use of Facebook
Authors
Issue Date2011
Citation
Computers in Human Behavior, 2011, v. 27 n. 2, p. 662-676 How to Cite?
AbstractThe purpose of this article is to review current published research studies focusing on the use of Facebook by students and teachers. The aim of the review is not to solely discuss Facebook in relation to teaching or learning purposes, or about its educational value per se, but also to present a detailed account of the participants' Facebook usage profile or the extent to which users are engaged in Facebook activities. The emphasis of this review will be upon empirical findings rather than opinion- or theoretical explanations. Following the review guidelines set by Creswell (Research Design Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches, 1994), I summarize the hitherto accumulated state of knowledge concerning Facebook and highlight questions or issues that research has left unresolved. This review is organized into three sections that cover the major topics of current research: (a) students' Facebook usage profile or extent of Facebook use (e.g.; time students spend on Facebook each day, students' motives for using Facebook, as well as various factors that may affect these usage profiles), (b) the effects of Facebook use (e.g.; effects of Facebook self-disclosure on teacher credibility, effects of Facebook use on student social presence and discussion, and effects of Facebook on students' academic performance), and (c) students' attitudes toward Facebook. The conclusions overall suggest that Facebook thus far has very little educational use, that students use Facebook mainly to keep in touch with known individuals, and that students tend to disclose more personal information about themselves on Facebook; hence attracting potential privacy risks upon themselves. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194300
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.88
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.646
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHew, KF-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-30T03:32:25Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-30T03:32:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationComputers in Human Behavior, 2011, v. 27 n. 2, p. 662-676-
dc.identifier.issn0747-5632-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194300-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this article is to review current published research studies focusing on the use of Facebook by students and teachers. The aim of the review is not to solely discuss Facebook in relation to teaching or learning purposes, or about its educational value per se, but also to present a detailed account of the participants' Facebook usage profile or the extent to which users are engaged in Facebook activities. The emphasis of this review will be upon empirical findings rather than opinion- or theoretical explanations. Following the review guidelines set by Creswell (Research Design Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches, 1994), I summarize the hitherto accumulated state of knowledge concerning Facebook and highlight questions or issues that research has left unresolved. This review is organized into three sections that cover the major topics of current research: (a) students' Facebook usage profile or extent of Facebook use (e.g.; time students spend on Facebook each day, students' motives for using Facebook, as well as various factors that may affect these usage profiles), (b) the effects of Facebook use (e.g.; effects of Facebook self-disclosure on teacher credibility, effects of Facebook use on student social presence and discussion, and effects of Facebook on students' academic performance), and (c) students' attitudes toward Facebook. The conclusions overall suggest that Facebook thus far has very little educational use, that students use Facebook mainly to keep in touch with known individuals, and that students tend to disclose more personal information about themselves on Facebook; hence attracting potential privacy risks upon themselves. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofComputers in Human Behavior-
dc.titleStudents' and teachers' use of Facebook-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chb.2010.11.020-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79551502524-
dc.identifier.hkuros244636-
dc.identifier.volume27-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage662-
dc.identifier.epage676-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287622000007-

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